Leadership and Two Types of Growth

first_img Free Webinar Series! Create a culture of value creation. Signup for this free webinar! In three, short, power-packed webinars, you will learn what you need to do to create a culture of value creators who create and win new opportunities. Download Now Leaders are responsible for envisioning the future and executing the plan to make that future a reality. This is growth: current state, new results, better future state. Leaders manage two types of growth.Company GrowthThe leader is responsible for the growth of their company. They’re responsible for things like revenue growth, profit growth, increased market share, and the growth of new capabilities. This is true whether you are the CEO, COO, CFO, CSO, department head, manager, shift supervisor, or team leader.This type of growth as a responsibility is expected of leaders. But the second kind of growth is the catalyst for the first type of growth. And often it isn’t given the same attention as the first.Individual GrowthThe growth of a company is accelerated when the leader focuses on the second, equally important type of growth: the growth of the individuals that the leader is responsible for leading.In order for a company to grow, the individuals within that company also need to grow. They need to grow by adopting new beliefs of what is possible, new beliefs of what is necessary, and new ideas about who they are. Einstein said it this way, “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.”The individuals inside the company also need to grow by gaining new capabilities, new competencies, and new skill sets. The greater the capabilities and skill, the more easily and more certain you produce new results.Leaders spend a lot of time and energy working on the first type of growth, the growth of the company’s results and financial metrics. Great leaders invest time in the second type of growth, the growth of the individuals that produce the first type of results, knowing that this is the fastest, surest way to produce those results.last_img read more

Protest against ‘extortion’

first_imgNormal life in Nagaland’s commercial hub Dimapur was affected on Wednesday as hundreds of people hit the streets to protest ‘illegal taxation’, or extortion, by several extremist groups and criminal organisations.The Public Action Committee of Naga Council Dimapur, which organised the protest rally, asked the Neiphiu Rio government to crack down on the outfits and stop such taxation.At least five extremist outfits such as Isak-Muivah faction of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland collect ‘tax’ periodically. Accordingly, government and corporate employees have to shell out 22-24% of a month’s salary while traders and the self-employed are required to pay more.last_img

Rio’s Olympics 1 year later: The good, the bad and the ugly

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ TNT sends Kia to 3rd straight loss in its Govs’ Cup opener Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games LATEST STORIES Save for minor cosmetic changes, a city fractured by mountains and searing inequality remains as it was. Violent crime mostly concealed during the Olympics is soaring, tied to Brazil’s deepest economic downturn in 100 years and unpaid policemen leaving in droves. Brazil’s military has been called in to quell Rio’s untethered violence.Rio barely managed to keep it together for the Olympics, needed a government bailout to hold the Paralympics and then collapsed under a grinding recession and sprawling corruption scandals.The games took place mostly in the south and west of the city, which remains white and wealthy. The rest is still a hodgepodge of dilapidated factories and hillside slums of cinderblocks, tin roofs and open troughs of raw sewage.Brazil says it spent $13 billion in public and private money to organize the Olympics — some estimates suggest $20 billion — and many games-related projects since then have been tied to corruption scandals that marred the games and drove up costs. Federal police and prosecutors have linked overpriced projects to graft between politicians and construction companies.A look at the fallout since the Olympics opened on Aug. 5:ADVERTISEMENT Carlos Nuzman, president of the organizing committee, was defeated earlier this year in an election to lead the Pan American Sports Organization. He ran on his record leading the Rio Olympics and finished third in a three-man race.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ “People have no dignity using public transportation in Rio de Janeiro,” she said.THE BADIn this July 16, 2017 photo, an empty parking lot is seen in front of the Athlete’s Village, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 3,600 apartments remain unoccupied. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)The Olympics left a half-dozen vacant sports arenas in the Olympic Park and 3,600 empty apartments in the boarded-up Olympic Village. Deodoro, a major complex of venues in the impoverished north, is shuttered behind iron gates.Standing across the street, Jose Mauricio Pehna de Souza was asked if Rio benefited from the Olympics.“I don’t think so, not us in Brazil,” he said.A $20 million golf course is struggling to find players and financing.A few dozen were on the course on a recent, sunny Saturday. The clubhouse is mostly unfurnished, and it costs non-Brazilians 560 reals ($180) for 18 holes and a cart.File – In this July 4, 2016 file photo, the Olympic Park of the 2016 Olympics is seen from the air, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Olympics left half-dozen vacant sports arenas in the Olympic Park, and 3,600 empty apartments in the vast, boarded-up Olympic Village. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)Organizers and the International Olympic Committee say Rio needs time to develop these venues, and faults Brazil’s deep recession for most of the problems.A prosecutor several months ago disputed this, saying the Olympic Park “lacked planning how to use white elephant” sports venues. Many were built as part of real estate deals that have yet to pan out.Juliana Solaira, a 30-year-old pharmacist who lives across from the park, called the space “an excellent legacy” but said “few people use it.” Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant “Here we see all this money spent,” she said. “Unfortunately, we see most of the arenas are closed. So I think it could have been used in a better way.”The park offers few amenities: no restaurants, no shade and nothing much to do except gawk at deserted arenas. City hall officials and the federal government say they’re planning an event for Aug. 5 to “fill all the arenas” for the day.THE UGLYIn this July 27, 2017 photo, trash lays on the coast of Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events.Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, its unwelcome stench often drifting along the highway from the international airport.“I think it’s gotten worse,” Brazil’s gold-medal sailor Kahena Kunze said in a recent interview. “There was always floating trash, but I see more and more. It’s no use hiding the trash because it comes back. I figured it would get worse because I haven’t seen anything concrete being done.”Avenida Brasil, the main north-south artery through the city, is a snarl of unfinished roads and express bus lanes, viaducts to nowhere and detours through miles (kilometers) of traffic cones.In this July 27, 2017 photo, children play with a foam board in the polluted Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)Some of the politicians behind the Olympics have been accused of graft, and organizers still owe creditors about $30 million to 40 million.Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who wept when Rio was awarded the games, was convicted last month on corruption charges and faces a 9 1/2-year prison term. He is appealing.Former Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes , the local moving force behind the Olympics, is being investigated for allegedly accepting at least 15 million reals ($5 million) in payments to facilitate construction projects tied to the games. He denies wrongdoing.Another early booster, former Rio state governor Sergio Cabral, is in jail on corruption charges. FILE – In this Aug. 20, 2016 file photo, Brazil’s Neymar kisses the ball before scoring the decisive penalty kick during the final match of the mens’s Olympic football tournament at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As Rio de Janeiro reels from corruption, rising crime and unfinished infrastructure, its residents can look no further than the iconic image of Neymar to remind them of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics that took place one year ago and the price they payed for hosting the games. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)RIO DE JANEIRO — Neymar kissed the ball, delivered a gold medal and then wept with other Brazilians.Look no further if you’re searching for an iconic image of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.ADVERTISEMENT National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress View comments FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ THE GOODIn this July 17, 2017 photo, a commuter waits for the next car at the Jardim Oceanico subway station, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Olympics left behind a new subway line extension, high-speed bus service, and an urban jewel: a renovated port area filled with food stands, musicians, and safe street life in city rife with crime. These probably would not have been built without the prestige of the Olympics. But the games also imposed deadlines and drove up the price. A state auditor’s report said the 9.7 billion real ($3 billion) subway was overbilled by 25 percent. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)The Olympics left behind a new subway line extension, high-speed bus service and an urban jewel: a renovated port area filled with food stands, musicians and safe street life in a city rife with crime.These probably would not have been built without the prestige of the Olympics. But the games also imposed deadlines and drove up the price. A state auditor’s report said the 9.7 billion real ($3 billion) subway was overbilled by 25 percent.Igor Silverio lives nearby the port in a favela — or shanytown — and came the other day to kick around a soccer ball with his two young boys. The area in his youth was known for decay and drunkenness.In this July 16, 2017 photo, Igor Silverio poses for a photo at Praca Maua in the renovated port area, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Before the Olympic Games the area was known for decay and drunkenness. Igor Silverio lives nearby the port in a favela, or shanytown, and came the other day to kick around a soccer ball with his two young boys. “For sure it’s better,” he said. But he added he “expected more from the Olympics.” (AP Photo/Renata Brito)“For sure it’s better,” he said. But, he added, he “expected more from the Olympics.”“From my point of view, the Olympics only benefited the foreigners. Local people themselves didn’t get much. The security situation isn’t good, the hospitals. I think these are investments that didn’t benefit many local people.”He said he skipped the Olympics because they were “too expensive” and located far away in the suburbs.Standing outside the new subway line, 57-year-old domestic worker Isa Trajano Fernandes said public transportation had improved but was still deficient.“When the Olympics were going on it was better, but then they let it slide,” she said.She complained about crowding on the new express buses and the lack of security. Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes “It’s the only medal that really mattered,” Salvador Gaeta said recently while cycling in the deserted Olympic Park. “Every Brazilian will remember it.”Other memories have faded at home since the Olympics opened a year ago. A few expectations were met, but many fell short of those promised by IOC President Thomas Bach and organizing committee head Carlos Nuzman.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBach boasted at the closing ceremony of “a Rio de Janeiro before, and a much better Rio de Janeiro after the Olympic Games.”Nuzman called Rio the next Barcelona, one of the cities clearly transformed by the games. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’last_img read more

India holds significant market opportunities, says Jack Nicklaus

first_imgIt’s been seven years since the legendary Jack Nicklaus retired from professional golf, but he continues to contribute to the game through his design projects across the world-including India. With golf becoming a vital amenity for luxury communities worldwide, the legend continues to be associated with golf-related real estate through his company Nicklaus Design. In an exclusive interview with Golf Digest India Editor Himanshu Singhal, he talks about opportunities in the Indian golf real estate market, designs he would like to see in India, along with his perspective on Indian and international golfers and the state of the game.GDI: What do you think makes India an interesting golf course design destination for real estate developers and course designers like you? JN: Golf has been played in India for decades, but there has not been a great amount of play relative to the incredible population of the country. While cricket and soccer continue to be popular in India, golf has been a bit slow to catch on with the masses. With golf becoming an Olympic sport, combined with the population in India and a large middle class, there’s a real opportunity that exists to introduce and grow a game that really fits the demographics and also the collective talents of an athletic nation. The opportunity truly exists and it’s an exciting one. I think you’re going to see the game of golf grow in India because of golf’s inclusion as an Olympic sport. My hope is that this heightened global awareness will help promote the game.advertisementGDI: Have you ever followed any of the Indian pro golfers, playing outside India? Arjun Atwal & Jeev Milkha Singh have both been your guests at The Memorial.JN: I have met both Arjun and Jeev, but I don’t know a great deal about them. I do know they are both very good players and wonderful ambassadors for India, as well as the game of golf within India. As talented as they are, they are just two from the country and there are more people from India that play the game and could perhaps compete on the world stage. There will be more as time goes on, which will be healthy for the overall growth of the sport in India.GDI: As a player, did you ever hear about India from anyone?JN: Although I have not spent a great deal of time there, I have had the opportunity to visit India for golf course design work. It is a beautiful country, with such diversity in land. The people are kind and welcoming and have embraced us whenever we have visited.GDI: What is it about golf related real estate in India that excites you the most? What’s so unique about the Indian golf real estate market?JN: There is a certain lifestyle that surrounds the game of golf and I think that lifestyle appeals to many potential consumers in emerging markets such as India. I also think there is a greater understanding in these markets about the increased value associated with residential tied into golf. There is a growing market in India of aspirational, second-home buyers and golf-related real estate helps respond to that demand.GDI: What kind of projects would you like to associate yourself with, in India, and where?JN: I think I’d like to be able to design golf courses that display and reflect the beauty of the game of golf and layouts that highlight the beautiful land and destinations within the country. I would like to design courses that help introduce people to the game, attract them into the game and help the game retain its fans. I want to design golf courses that are enjoyable to play on a daily basis, but when needed, you can hide the pins on the right areas of the greens, move the tees back and have the ability to play a tournament on that same golf course. One of the challenges for a designer is to find that balance in design when you can create a beautiful golf course that people can enjoy on a daily basis, but one that can also be a tournament site. It can be a difficult thing to do, because you’ve got to make the design simple enough to encourage new people to learn the game as well. So it’s a combination, but it’s a goal we as a design firm try to meet, each time we are given the opportunity.GDI: Do you think you can contribute to the development of golf in India in any way? How would you like to go about it?advertisementJN:  We have been working hard to contribute to the development of golf in India. But like many emerging markets, India has its own challenges. It can be very difficult to acquire land and assemble people to put it together and commit to it. We’ve done a couple of projects in India but it’s been relatively slow. I can understand that because of the world economy and because of the lack of available land and water. Having said that, I have challenged everyone in our design firm to make certain that if someone comes to us with the desire to create a golf course, no matter how much land they have, we should do everything in our power to provide them a golf experience. Nowhere does it mandate that we have to create for the client an 18-hole golf course of championship length. The best thing we can do for India and the development of the game is to provide every interested owner or developer a ‘golf experience.’ This can be anything from 12 holes to nine to six to just three. It can be a golf academy or even a learning center that has practice holes and greens. The game of golf has always been controlled by how far a golf ball goes. But, I think it should be the other way round. We have a lot of people coming to us with 40-acres, 60-acres and 80-acres of land and an intent  to do a golf course. I think we owe it to the game of golf to introduce them to the game, retain them and design a course on that piece of property. We need to develop a golf ball to fit the property and not the other way round. If we can do that, the game of golf will grow in India and golf will be a far more affordable and accessible sport.GDI: Despite some good starts and tournament victories, Tiger Woods hasn’t been successful in finishing at the majors. How would you rate his game at the moment and where do you see him going? Do you think Tiger will ever be able to break your record of 18 majors?JN: I have said many times before that I believe Tiger will break my records, but he still has to do it. We are in the midst of an incredible streak as it relates to the majors and first-time winners. So what that emphasizes is not only how tough it is to win multiple major championships but the depth of young talent currently out there. Tiger needs to win four majors to tie me and five to break the record. I believe that would be one more major than the career total of any other active player in the game today (Phil Mickelson has won four majors). Tiger has the talent and the work ethic to accomplish it, but he would be the first to tell you that he still has to go out and do it.advertisementGDI: Who is the best player in the world right now?JN:  I would have to say that the actual number one position is up for grabs. The top-ranked player in the world right now is Luke Donald. But if you look back at the recent major championship, when Webb Simpson won the US Open, he became the 15th player to win the last 15 majors. That’s the longest streak in almost 80 years (it matches the longest such streak since the Masters began in 1934). Perhaps more interesting, however, is that Webb Simpson’s win made it nine straight first-time major champions. That shows me that there is wonderful parity and depth in golf. Any one of these players can emerge and win their second and third majors. Then, all of a sudden, they will be looked at as being number one. The game being played at the highest level is very healthy, exciting and positioned well for the future.GDI: What is the secret of your success in golf as a player as well as a designer? Do you have any advice for the Indian pro golfers to help improve their game?JN: There is only a small percentage of golfers-be it in India or elsewhere-who will eventually play tournament golf and hopefully enjoy success, so I don’t think that’s as important as focusing on the average or beginning golfer. I think the important part is getting people to try the game, experience all the wonderful aspects of it and simply enjoy it. Golf is a game you play for a lifetime and one you can enjoy with your sons or daughters, your grandchildren and even your great grandchildren eventually. I picked up the game of golf when I was 10-years old, but I also know people who did not take up the game until their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Golf, as much or more than any sport or game, has the ability to teach valuable, character-building life lessons. That’s why various junior programs, such as The First Tee or SNAG, have enjoyed such success. They not only introduce the game to young boys and girls, but golf becomes a vehicle to teach them important life lessons-be it honesty, integrity, sportsmanship, discipline, or how to interact with adults and other children. The first book I ever wrote was called “The Greatest Game of All,” and I think one of the reasons the sport is so wonderful is because golf is a game for a lifetime and you should have the time of your life playing it.As for any advice I might offer an aspiring professional golfer in India, it would be the same advice I offer to any golfer who wants to develop his or her skills. You need to know who you are, understand your game, and play within yourself. It’s what I tell beginning and high-handicap golfers and essentially what I have told golfers such as Rory McIlroy. I have told this story many times before, but I think the best lesson I was ever taught-and it came from my long-time instructor Jack Grout-was to understand why I play golf, what I thought about when I played golf, how to teach others and most important, how to teach myself. Jack was my first instructor and he was a part of my life until he passed away when I was 49. During my entire career, he rarely stepped foot on a practice tee during a major championship. A successful golfer occasionally has to win without their best game and I won many times. I did so because I could control what I was doing. Because of the lessons taught to me by Grout, I not only understood the game, but understood my game. He taught me to understand why I was doing something on the golf course. He made me use my head, not just my golf swing. When I went out to play golf, I didn’t have to run back to him. He would teach me to be independent. That’s how I became a better player.last_img read more