Android Now the #1 Smartphone Platform Worldwide

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#Google#mobile#news#NYT#web Related Posts Android is now the number one smartphone platform worldwide, according to new data from analysts at Canalys. In Q4 2010, shipments of Android-based smartphones reached 32.9 million while shipments of phones running Nokia’s Symbian platform were 31.0 million. Previously, Nokia had held the top spot.?However, these rankings are based on handset shipments, not market share. Nokia retains its lead as the top global smartphone vendor with a share of 28%, the analyst firm noted in its findings.Update: These figures have been questioned by competing analyst firms. Read more here.Android #1 Based on 2010 ShipmentsCanalys says that the volume of Android-based devices was boosted by strong performance from several smartphone vendors, including LG, Samsung, Acer and HTC, all of which had seen their Android, and Android-based (OMS, Tapas,* etc.) platforms increase dramatically year-over-year. For example, LG saw a 4,127% increase, Samsung, 1, 474%, Acer, 709% and HTC 371%. ?HTC and Samsung combined accounted for almost 45% of Google Android-based smartphone shipments.*OMS and Tapas are Android-based operating systems produced in China. These were also counted towards Android’s growth. sarah perez Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Smartphone Market in 2010The smartphone market overall has continued to grow with 2010 shipments reaching 101.2 million units, or 89% year-over-year growth. For Q4, shipments were just below 300 million, with a growth rate of 80% over last year.?The largest markets (based on shipments) in 2010 were Europe, the Middle East and Africa, with 38.8 million units and year-over-year growth of 90%. Nokia led in Africa (EMEA) and Asia Pacific, but RIM beat out Nokia in Latin America. The mid-range BlackBerry Curve devices contributed to RIM’s growth in that region, Canalys said.The U.S., meanwhile, was the largest country in terms of shipments, more than double the size of the Chinese smartphone market. Here, RIM re-took first place from Apple, benefitting from its first quarter shipments of the BlackBerry Torch. HTC remained in third place. These positions will soon change, analyst Tim Shepherd stated, given the new Verizon-Apple partnership, which will soon shake up the mobile landscape.Canalys VP and Principal Analyst Chris Jones warned smartphone vendors not to become complacent in hearing the news of the smartphone market’s growth, saying that 2011 was shaping up to be a highly competitive year. This year vendors will use new technology, “such as dual-core processors, NFC [near field communication] and 3D displays to differentiate their products and maintain value.”last_img read more

National Register of Citizens: Assam man suffers double blow

first_imgParalysis robbed Azizul Hoque of his ability to work, before the system, members of his family said, snatched his identity as an Indian more than two years ago.They are now counting the days for the next hearing in the Supreme Court, which sought replies from the Centre and the Assam government on how the 41-year-old Hoque came to be declared a foreigner and lodged in a detention centre on March 24, 2017.Family hopefulAnas Tanwir, handling the case, said the apex court on July 3 given the Central and Assam governments two weeks to reply.“That means they have to reply by July 17, right? And we can hope for a hearing by the Supreme Court soon after,” Baharul Islam, Mr. Hoque’s elder brother, told The Hindu from their village Singiapathar in central Assam’s Nagaon district. The village is about 140 km east of Guwahati.Mr. Islam, in his late 40s, could not recall when the Assam police’s border wing sent a notice to his brother. The border wing is tasked with detecting and deporting foreigners and refers cases to a Foreigners’ Tribunal (FT) for deciding a suspect’s fate.“It was 12-13 years ago. He went to the police when summoned about 10 years ago before an illness made him paralysed. He had always been a bhodai (dimwitted) and paralysis prevented him from going out to work,” said Mr. Islam, who sells vegetables in a nearby town.“I stay away from home most of the time. But Azizul and many others in my family are always at home. They said they gave him notice thrice, but none of us received it. They took him to the Tezpur Central Jail’s detention centre out of the blue,” he said.‘Doubtful’ tagThe problem for Mr. Hoque began in 1997, when for the first time his name figured in the voters’ list but with the ‘D’ (doubtful) tag that indicated he was suspected to be an illegal immigrant. None of his three elder siblings — sister Hafiza Khatun and eldest brother Khairul Islam — are D-voters.The name of Mr. Hoque, like everyone else in his family, was included in the draft National Register of Citizens (NRC) published in July 2018. He was put in the additional list of 1.02 lakh NRC-excluded people published on June 26.“Our father Abdur Rahman’s name is in the 1965 voters’ list. Our grandfather Pashan Ali was granted land patta (deed) in 1940. Why should our youngest brother be singled out as a foreigner? This is just harassment because of the language we speak and religion we follow,” Mr. Islam said.Members of Mr. Hoque’s family said they have promised him that he would be brought back home soon. They are pinning hopes on the Supreme Court for his release sooner.last_img read more

India Today’s letters to the editor of february about phone-tapping controversy

first_imgAmar Singh tackles the phone-tapping controversyTalking TroubleBy making the “phone battle” a national issue, Samajwadi Party (SP) General Secretary Amar Singh has blocked any possibility of leakage of the taped conversation that could have embarrassed him (“The Phone Battle”, January 23). However, politically he has not gained much. The mutual,Amar Singh tackles the phone-tapping controversyTalking TroubleBy making the “phone battle” a national issue, Samajwadi Party (SP) General Secretary Amar Singh has blocked any possibility of leakage of the taped conversation that could have embarrassed him (“The Phone Battle”, January 23). However, politically he has not gained much. The mutual abuse of the SP and the Congress could only help the BJP.A. JACOB SAHAYAM, Thiruvananthapuram”The way Amar Singh has treated the phone-tapping controversy shows that his aim is not to bring up the issue of surveillance but to settle political scores.”B.K. PARMAR, GhaziabadIs it a mere coincidence that immediately after Amar Singh’s brother joined the Congress and claimed to expose the SP leader’s activities, the allegations of phone tapping surfaced? The issue has also pushed aside a more serious matter of the Supreme Court notice to Mulayam Singh Yadav in a case of disproportionate assets. The protests by Amar Singh appear like tactics to garner public sympathy in Uttar Pradesh, where his party’s image has hit rock bottom.P.K. SRIVASTAVA, on e-mailAmar Singh has emerged as the real leader of the Opposition which is starved of issues with which to take on the Centre.NAVNEET DHAWAN, DelhiIt has become fashionable to accuse Sonia Gandhi of anything and everything, no matter what the problem the politicians and bureaucrats face. Since she was born in a foreign country these people with no values find an easy scapegoat in her.GREGORY D’SOUZA, HaridwarPolitical parties always exploit scandals to make it to the headlines. Amar Singh and his party have done the same.K. CHIDANAND KUMAR, BangaloreadvertisementWrong ServeI want to clarify that I was never an employee of K.K. Birla, whereas, you have mentioned that I was a protocol officer (“The Phone Battle”, January 23).AMAR SINGH, National General Secretary, SP, DelhiAmusing TwistsWhere was Brinda Karat when pesticides were found in cold drinks (“Yogi in a Tangle”, January 23)? Such contents were not mentioned on the bottles of these beverages. Even mentioning “artificial colours and flavours” does not specify the exact nature of the contents. A number of medicines, toothpastes and ointments are gelatinebased. Is it not the duty of the manufacturers to mention that gelatine is derived from bones? Why should it be mandatory for only ayurvedic medicines to mention all the contents?RAJIV CHOPRA, DehradunIt is not correct to say that “the law does not require declaration of ingredients of a particular medicine if it is based on classical texts” recognised under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act. The Second Schedule of the Act requires “all medicines other than homeopathic” to have a list of all ingredients on the label or container. Medicines that contravene this requirement are deemed to be “misbranded drugs” and invite legal action. The only concession available to the ayurvedic, siddha and unani products is that if the ingredients are listed in the classical texts, then manufacturers need not obtain marketing approval from the Drugs Controller General.CHANDRA M. GULHATI, DelhiThe article is highly biased against the yogi. While yoga guru B.K.S. Iyengar may have excellent knowledge of certain aspects of yoga, he seems to have none as far as pranayama is concerned.Y.N.I. ANAND, MysoreIyenger is a revered yoga guru for the Indian media because he has taught yoga abroad. Ramdev’s simple yoga steps are imparting health benefits to millions of Indians but this is not the criterion by which the Indian media in the English language judges anybody. Yoga and ayurveda are India’s ancient treasures and if someone is making the common man aware of their benefits, then his efforts should be appreciated. Politicians like Karat are free to raise the labour issue if there is a violation of the law but mixing it with the issue of vegetarianism only makes them a butt of joke.ARUN BALA, on e-mailRamdev has done injustice to not only vegetarians but also non-vegetarians. For who would like to eat the skull and bone powder of human beings? He should be punished.SNEHAL SHUKLA, AhmedabadKarat has displayed great courage by exposing Ramdev’s questionable acts. His claims of achieving cures for cancer, advanced arthritis and diabetes through yoga and ayurvedic medicines have not been scientifically evaluated.RAJU VAISHYA, DelhiThe controversy over ayurvedic medicines underscores the need for stringent regulation. Surveys reveal that adulteration of alternative medicines is rampant across India. Such practices bring the Indian businesses and philosophically rich medical systems into disrepute. A better regulatory framework will reward genuine practitioners and expose charlatans.ANIL KUMAR PANDIT, DelhiadvertisementThe Jehad FactoryRecruitment of the Hindus by the Hizb-ul Mujahideen in Kashmir on allurement of money exposes the falsity of the terrorists’ commitment to a cause (“Now Hindu Jehadis”, January 23). The picture is the same elsewhere too. The Maoists in Jehanabad and Giridih reportedly distributed pamphlets in Jharkhand and Bihar, inviting young people to join the “revolution” on a monthly stipend of Rs 2,000 and compensation of Rs 2 lakh in case of death.ASOKE C. BANERJEE, KolkataThe profession of terrorism has nothing to do with religion. It is exploitation of the youth. Governments in all states as well as at the Centre must provide counselling and employment to the boys who have taken up arms to bring them back into the mainstream.RAKESH BAHUGUNA, on e-mailFoot in MouthPutting his foot in his mouth is not new for Raj Singh Dungarpur, the manager of the Indian team (“Unsound Bite”, January 23). Raking up the issue of Sourav Ganguly’s performance at this stage does not serve any purpose. It will only demoralise the team. Dungarpur should be removed from the post. Discipline is not something to be enforced only among the players. It is applicable to our loud-mouthed sports officials also.V.V.S. MANI, MumbaiTest of MettleWest Bengal rather than Bihar will be the real challenge for Election Commission (EC) official K.J. Rao because in Bihar the people were with him (“For a Level Playing Field”, January 23). But West Bengal may not allow Rao to function smoothly with both the state Government and party cadres determined to resist any change.SUBHASH C. AGRAWAL, DelhiThe article says that I had requested the EC to remove state government employees from the election coordination committees. I had petitioned the commission to exclude only the employees belonging to the Coordination Committee of State Government Employees’ Unions and the “Non-Gazetted Police Karmachari Samiti” or to any of their affiliates.TATHAGATA ROY, President, BJP, West BengalOverseas Citizenship of India cards to NRIsFAMILY FOLDSGiving Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI) cards to the NRIs is a way of reaching out to them (“Promises, Promises,” January 23). It will help them develop a stake in India.REKHA RAI, PatnaIt is a tragedy that the Government has decided to shower sops like voting rights and OCI cards on the NRIs. Investments in India by them have always been driven by interest rather than loyalty.THARCIUS S. FERNANDO, ChennaiIndia is finally treating the NRIs right by welcoming them. This will create a goodwill trust for it abroad.VIVEK RASTOGI, Shimlalast_img read more

Justice Minister Jody WilsonRaybould says adopting UNDRIP into Canadian law unworkable

first_imgAPTN National News NIAGARA FALLS – The federal government has said numerous times it embraces the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).But on Tuesday Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould made the government’s stance on UNDRIP a little clearer by saying it can’t be adopted as is into Canadian law.“Simplistic approaches such as adopting the United Nations declaration as being Canadian law are unworkable and, respectfully, a political distraction to undertaking the hard work actually required to implement it back home in communities,” said Wilson-Raybould in a speech to a room of chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations 37th annual general assembly Tuesday in Niagara Falls.Read the the full speech here.She said she would like to throw the Indian Act in the fire but it’s not a practical option. She called on First Nations to provide ideas for legislation that helps communities rebuild outside of the Indian Act.Back in May, Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said Canada would fully embrace UNDRIP.Bennett said Ottawa would be consulting with First Nation, Inuit and Metis people before moving to codify UNDRIP in Canadian law.“It would be very important that we consult First Nation, Inuit and Metis on anything we would do in order to codify (UNDRIP),” said Bennett.@UBCIC @APTNNews is this not embracing UNDRIP & reconciliation? Instead of trying to continue to unilateral impose Cdn ‘laws’ on our ntns?— Chadwick Cowie (@ChadCowie) July 12, 2016It appears that while the Harper government announced in 2010 it would “endorse” UNDRIP it officially maintained an objection to the document. The previous Conservative government said UNDRIP was an aspirational document that would be interpreted “in a manner that is consistent with our Constitutional and legal framework.”Bennett said the document was “breathing life” into section 35 of the Constitution which guarantees Aboriginal rights.UNDRIP was originally adopted in 2007 by 144 countries. At the time Canada, U.S., Australia and New Zealand voted against the document. Since then, all four countries have signed on.last_img read more

Air Canadaled consortium signs deal to buy Aeroplan program from Aimia

first_imgMONTREAL – An Air Canada-led consortium has reached a $450-million deal to acquire the Aeroplan loyalty program from Aimia Inc., earning plaudits from analysts but leaving questions about Aimia’s future.The group, which includes TD Bank, CIBC and Visa Canada Corp., has agreed to pay $450 million in cash and assume the approximately $1.9-billion liability associated with Aeroplan miles customers have accumulated.“We are pleased to see that an agreement in principle has been reached as Aeroplan members can continue to earn and redeem with confidence,” Air Canada chief executive Calin Rovinescu said in a statement on behalf of the consortium Tuesday.“This transaction, if completed, should produce the best outcome for all stakeholders, including Aeroplan members, as it would allow for a smooth transition to Air Canada’s new loyalty program launching in 2020, safeguarding their miles and providing convenience and value for millions of Canadians.”The agreement comes weeks after Aimia rejected an earlier offer from the consortium as too low and outlined that it believed $450 million would be a fair price, saying that a number of shareholders were upset with the low offer.The price is up from an initial offer in July of $250 million in cash and the assumption of the reward point liability that was rejected by Aimia.Aimia shares were up 9.4 per cent at $4.20 in afternoon trading after hitting a 52-week high of $4.60 earlier in the session. Air Canada shares jumped nearly eight per cent to $26.69.Any deal between the consortium and Aimia, which had been seeking out new partners to offset the loss of Air Canada when a current agreement was set to end in 2020, would be a fruitful outcome for all stakeholders, said GMP Securities analyst Martin Landry.National Bank Financial analyst Adam Shine, however, said he was “left wondering how Aimia could trumpet its Plan B strategy with such optimism and yet set a seemingly low Aeroplan value.”The Aeroplan deal is expected to close this fall.The agreement, which is supported by Aimia’s board and Mittleman Brothers, Aimia’s largest shareholder that had previously opposed the lower offer, is subject to shareholder approval and other closing conditions.Mittleman Brothers, which holds a 17.6-per-cent stake in Aimia, defended its acceptance of the deal and suggested a price tag of $1 billion — which it demanded earlier this month — now seemed unfeasible.“We believe that our acquiescence in agreeing to sell Aeroplan for $450M in cash was the best available outcome for all Aimia stakeholders,” the investment firm said in a statement Tuesday.The bid would leave Aimia with more than $1 billion in cash to invest elsewhere, Mittleman Brothers said.Christopher Mittleman, chief investment officer of the New York-based company, bristled earlier this month at a $325-million offer from the consortium, calling it “coercive” and “blatantly inadequate” in an open letter to Aimia’s board.Mittleman recommended on Aug. 6 that Aimia accept no less than $1 billion, “especially not with a gun held to its head by its key commercial partners.”Aimia’s recent Aeroplan partnership agreements with three Canadian airlines — Air Transat, Flair Airlines and Porter Airlines — are now up in the air.“Those were perhaps part of the negotiations and trying to build the pressure on getting a transaction,” said AltaCorp Capital analyst Chris Murray.Aimia had also been in discussions with the Oneworld airline alliance, whose members include British Airways, American Airlines and Cathay Pacific.Gabor Forgacs, associate professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, said the key incentive for Canada’s largest airline is customer data that can be used to encourage more member spending.“Every time a member of the loyalty program goes to make a purchase and taps or swipes that card, he or she would earn points — however, they will agree to give away the information,” Forgacs said. “They will know where I was, what I bought, how much I spent.”Earlier this month, Aimia management said in a conference call it has considered further asset sales and a wind-up of the company. One analyst noted that Aimia could soon resemble a “holding company with limited assets.”Analysts predicted about 1,000 Aeroplan employees — roughly 60 per cent of Aimia’s workforce — would transfer to Air Canada if the deal goes ahead.Aimia’s other assets include a 48-per-cent stake in Aeromexico’s loyalty program, PLM, and a 20-per-cent share of Air Asia’s loyalty program, Think Big.“With the sale of Aeroplan, the focus for Aimia investors will shift to actual net proceeds received from the sale and the company’s subsequent capital redeployment strategy,” RBC Capital Markets analyst Drew McReynolds wrote in a report.The future of the program has faced questions since Air Canada announced last year that it planned to launch its own loyalty rewards plan in July, 2020 when its partnership with Aimia expires.The May 2017 announcement caused Aimia shares to nosedive 63 per cent in one day.Air Canada created Aeroplan as an in-house loyalty program, but it was spun off in 2005 as an independent business under a court-supervised restructuring of the airline. At the time, CIBC was Aeroplan’s main bank partner.Since 2014, TD has been Aeroplan’s main Visa card partner although CIBC continues to offer cards that earn Aeroplan points that can be redeemed for Air Canada flights and other rewards.Companies in this story: (TSX:AC, TSX:AIM, TSX:TD, TSX:CM)Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misattributed a quote from Air Canada’s CEO to an analyst.last_img read more

Bank fined 13B in penalties over Cuba dealings

first_imgNEW YORK — One of France’s largest banks, Societe Generale, is paying $1.3 billion in penalties for violating U.S. trade sanctions on Cuba.U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman in New York announced the deal Monday.He says it’s the second largest penalty ever imposed on a financial institution for violating U.S. economic sanctions.As part of the deal, prosecutors deferred criminal charges including conspiracy to violate the Trading with the Enemy Act. The charges would be dropped entirely after three years.Authorities say between 2004 and 2010, the bank facilitated the flow of $13 billion through Cuban businesses.The bank says it regrets “shortcomings” identified in the case.Berman says the bank has co-operated and promised to revamp internal controls so it doesn’t happen again.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Trans Mountain response not just about one pipeline says Trudeau

first_imgOTTAWA, O.N. – The future of resource development across Canada depends on the federal government responding correctly to a court ruling that has stalled the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, Justin Trudeau said Friday.The government’s response is about more than just one pipeline project, the prime minister said as he took part in what was billed as an armchair discussion at a business gathering in Ottawa.“What we need is not just this pipeline,” Trudeau said. “This is the way the world is going, and if we can demonstrate clarity and certainty for business through the processes to the investors, we will be able to get more built.”The opposition parties called on the Liberal government Friday to study the Trans Mountain court decision, and use it to better define what it means to truly consider the wishes of Indigenous communities before it launches into any new consultations over Trans Mountain.The Liberals promised a new process for consultation with Indigenous communities during the last election campaign, “and that promise was completely broken,” New Democrat MP Rachel Blaney said before introducing a motion that would see a Commons committee examine why the court rejected the Trudeau cabinet’s approval of the Trans Mountain expansion.Her motion, along with a similar one introduced by Conservative MP Cathy McLeod, was voted down by Liberal members of the Commons committee on Indigenous and northern affairs. The Liberals didn’t speak to the motions and gave no reasons for rejecting them before adjourning. Trudeau called the court ruling “frustrating” and “devastating” for communities that were relying on the employment that would come with the Trans Mountain project.center_img “We need to be able to build resource projects of all different types with appropriate social license.”The Federal Court of Appeal quashed approval for the Trans Mountain project last week, citing insufficient consultation with Indigenous communities and failure to assess the environmental impact of more tanker traffic off British Columbia’s coast.The Conservatives and New Democrats both have blamed Trudeau for the ruling, accusing him of relying on “botched” consultations to further the pipeline project, which would bring more Alberta oilsands crude to port in B.C. for export overseas.But Trudeau said the decision must be seen in a broader context if the government is to ensure that Trans Mountain – and other resource projects – don’t get bogged down in endless court battles in the future.Trudeau fired back at critics who accuse his government of being unable to get large resource projects built, pointing to one major development that has already been approved in Canada but is facing roadblocks south of the border.“The Keystone XL pipeline has been approved in Canada for a long time and it’s bogged down in processes in the United States because, again, there are concerns that they hadn’t done enough around consultations in partnership with communities and environmental science,” Trudeau told the gathering.last_img read more

Natural Resources minister says new pipelines the answer to oil price problems

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi says he shares Albertan’s “frustration” at billions of dollars being lost to the Canadian economy due to oil price discounts linked to export pipeline capacity constraints.But he says Ottawa is focused on finding long-term solutions by getting approval for new export pipelines such as the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project it bought in August and by pursuing Bill C-69 to reform the National Energy Board.Following a speech at an Energy Council of Canada forum in downtown Calgary, Sohi told reporters the key to building pipelines is building trust in regulatory processes and engaging affected parties early on so that approvals aren’t overturned, as was the case with Trans Mountain. The judge that overturned that project’s NEB approval cited a lack of meaningful consultations with Indigenous people and failure to consider marine environmental impacts.An NEB reconsideration of the identified issues is expected to conclude by February but Sohi said he won’t put a deadline on new Indigenous consultations now underway.Asked about an Alberta request in October for the federal government to support crude-by-rail shipments, Sohi said the Alberta request is being examined by his department but he hasn’t actuallyseen it.“My administration has been engaging with the province of Alberta, their officials and the officials from other provinces to explore options, options that can work, options that are practical to implement and options that will actually give us the ability to transport Alberta resources in a way that needs to be done,” he said.“Those are short-term solutions but the long-term solution ismaking sure pipeline capacity is expanded.”Asked then what options are being considered, he said: “I don’t know what those options are. Officials are engaging with the provincial officials.”last_img read more

Pipelines UN immigration feature as protest convoy reaches Parliament Hill

first_imgOTTAWA, O.N. – A convoy of Canadians fed up with the Liberal government rolled into Ottawa Tuesday with demands as varied as their vehicles.The United We Roll convoy began in Red Deer, Alta., on Valentine’s Day and made its way east over four days with stops for rallies along the way. After four days of cross-country driving, the convoy mustered in Arnprior, Ont., just outside the capital but got off to a late start Tuesday morning. With police escorts, its trucks, buses and cars hit downtown Ottawa after the morning rush hour, disrupting the city only slightly.Scores of semis, pickups and other vehicles occupied several blocks of the street in front of Parliament as about 150 people gathered in knee-deep snow on the Hill for speeches by organizers and a handful of conservative lawmakers. One placard on a truck outside Parliament declared NO to “UN/globalism, carbon tax, tanker ban, dirty foreign oil, open borders” and YES to “Charge Trudeau with treason, Energy East, yes to pipe lines, look after veterans, photo ID & Canadian citizenship to vote.”Other signs backed a variety of causes, including Canadian agriculture and protecting free speech. One called on Canadians to eat beef.Started by Glen Carritt, the owner of an oilfield fire and safety company in Innisfail, Alta., the convoy protesters have demanded the Liberal government scrap the carbon tax and two bills that overhaul environmental assessments of energy projects and ban oil tankers from the northern coast of British Columbia.“The core message is we need immediate action for our pipelines to get in the ground, to get to tidewater and to the rest of Canada,” he told The Canadian Press in a previous interview. About 30 police officers stood between the convoy members and a counter-protest that gathered nearby, focused on Indigenous causes.“It is time that Canada has a prime minister that is proud of our energy sector,” Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer told the crowd. He emphasized the convoy members’ demand that the federal government get pipelines built to help get Alberta oil and gas to new markets.Half a dozen Conservative MPs and senators blasted the Liberals’ carbon tax and reiterated their support for the oil and gas sector. They left out another of the convoy organizers’ complaints: that Canada signed a non-binding United Nations agreement on migration in December.The Conservative party opposed the signing of the global compact, although Scheer did not mention it.Nor did People’s Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier, whose omission drew cries from the crowd when he spoke about the importance of the oil industry.“Where’s the UN?” yelled one woman.center_img Mark Friesen, a convoy organizer from Saskatoon, gave one of the day’s first speeches, talking about federal policies as the results of agreements with the United Nations to implement its sustainable development agenda.“You cut the head of the snake off, we get our country back, all of it, including pipelines built, including dumping the carbon tax, including getting rid of the migrant pact,” he said.Friesen, like many of the convoy participants, is affiliated with the populist “yellow-vest” movement, Carritt said the convoy was not itself a yellow-vest protest. Amid concerns the convoy had become a magnet for extremist, anti-immigrant activists, organizers stressed the rally was peaceful and open to anyone fed up with the federal government.Despite charges by its critics, Friesen insisted the yellow-vest movement is not racist or anti-immigrant.“We are a country of immigrants,” he said. “We need more immigration but we need to determine these policies in Canada for Canadians.”Meanwhile after a cabinet meeting inside Parliament’s West Block, Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi told reporters he was focused on increasing pipeline capacity.“It’s very unfortunate that the convoy that is here today, their message has drifted away from pipelines to issues that are not relevant to the discussion on pipelines,” the Edmonton MP said.A second day of protests is planned for Wednesday.last_img read more