A350 XWB joins the fleet

first_imgThree widebody Airbus aircraft, the A380, A330 and the new A350 XWB, took off from Toulouse Thursday September 19 flying together for the first time before continuing on separate flights.The A350 XWB is the latest aircraft from Airbus and is designed to replace the A330 and takeon Boeing’s 787 and 777 families.To date Airbus has sold 682 A350 XWBs over three models.last_img

Companies help conquer breast cancer

first_imgThe retail group Foschini is one of the companies that helps PinkDrive keep its educational and clinical trucks on the road. These trucks’ services include women’s health education.It costs R10-million to build one truck. PinkDrive’s monthly running costs are R700,000. PinkDrive’s services include free education on women’s health, mammograms and clinical breast examinations. (Image: Supplied)Melissa JavanHenrietta van Kramberg says she should have given up on life when her child died but she didn’t. Instead, following a diagnosis of breast cancer in 2010, she decided to fight back.The 43-year-old is one of 11 women who are sharing their stories during the Courage to Conquer campaign, taking place in the Breast Cancer Awareness Month of October. The campaign is an initiative by retail group Foschini. It is to build awareness and to fundraise for the organisation, PinkDrive.She kicked cancer’s butt in six-inch heels, Van Kramberg says. “Giving up is not an option. As a mum if you survive the passing of your child, there’s not much that can get you down.”Watch Van Kramberg talk about how she motivated herself in her battle against cancer:Watch Lizelle Knott explain how her son became her motivation to fight cancer:Lizelle Knott, a 36-year-old, says early detection made a huge difference. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014. “If you have a positive attitude, anything can be an adventure,” she says of her journey.PinkDrivePinkDrive is known as South Africa’s “breast cancer community carer”, the non-profit organisation says on its website.It has mobile units which cross three provinces, visiting urban and semi-urban areas, to give people access to mammographies and gynaecological services.Besides free education on women’s health, the mobile clinics offer free pap smears and clinical examinations, as well as information on how to do breast self-examinations.Since its launch in 2011, PinkDrive has taught more than 260,000 women about breast health.Courage to conquerNaeema Cassimjee, Foschini brand manager, says that in previous years the clothing retailer has partnered with PinkDrive to raise breast cancer awareness and to keep the mammography and educational units of PinkDrive on the road.“The campaign this year is unique in the sense that we have provided a platform for women from different backgrounds from all over South Africa to share their stories. [They talk about] how they found the courage to conquer breast cancer,” she says.“The campaign takes a positive approach where we aim to highlight the courage and strength that women have within them.”The partners approached cancer organisations Look Good, Feel Better; Reach for Recovery; and Cancervive, to ask for volunteers, Cassimjee explains. These volunteers are survivors of breast cancer, and were willing to share their stories with others.“We received a lot of interest but unfortunately had to eventually cut it down to 11 women.”She says to support PinkDrive through Courage to Conquer, people can buy breast cancer awareness key rings and Playtex or Foschini branded bras. A portion of the funds raised is donated to PinkDrive.“A donation to the PinkDrive has also been made by the photographer who shot the Breast Cancer campaign,” Cassimjee says.To watch the videos of the other cancer survivors telling their stories, visit the Foschini South Africa YouTube channel.Corporates playing a roleFebe Meyer, PinkDrive spokesperson, says the organisation works with numerous brands, individuals and companies throughout the year to make PinkDrive successful.“Our major sponsors are the financial contributors Pick n Pay, MTN Foundation, the Bidvest Group and Bridgestone.“As PinkDrive does not receive any government funding, we are grateful for any corporate or individual that assist the PinkDrive in raising funds. The impact of any amount raised assists PinkDrive to keep our existing mobile units on the road,” she says.“It also enables us to provide free services to all the medically uninsured people in South Africa.”One of the fundraising initiatives was the Cell C SA Lingerie Fashion Show held on 6 October 2016 at Canal Walk shopping centre in Cape Town. The aim of the event was to distribute 100 care packs to cancer patients at hospitals in the city.The first mobile screening unit of PinkDrive launched in the Western Cape in 2011. It operated through local clinics, community health centres and hospitals. (Image: Supplied)Meyer says the current PinkDrive fleet consists of three mobile mammography units, one educational truck and five educational vehicles.Since the organisation’s inception in 2011, more than 10,600 mammograms and more than 102,000 clinical breast examinations have been done.“It should be noted that currently one unit is doing 20 public sector hospitals’ work in a month! This is a direct ‘report’ of what PinkDrive is doing with all the funding received,” says Meyer.PinkDrive travels to urban and semi-urban areas throughout South Africa. “We have representation in Gauteng, the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Rio’s Olympics 1 year later: The good, the bad and the ugly

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ TNT sends Kia to 3rd straight loss in its Govs’ Cup opener Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games LATEST STORIES Save for minor cosmetic changes, a city fractured by mountains and searing inequality remains as it was. Violent crime mostly concealed during the Olympics is soaring, tied to Brazil’s deepest economic downturn in 100 years and unpaid policemen leaving in droves. Brazil’s military has been called in to quell Rio’s untethered violence.Rio barely managed to keep it together for the Olympics, needed a government bailout to hold the Paralympics and then collapsed under a grinding recession and sprawling corruption scandals.The games took place mostly in the south and west of the city, which remains white and wealthy. The rest is still a hodgepodge of dilapidated factories and hillside slums of cinderblocks, tin roofs and open troughs of raw sewage.Brazil says it spent $13 billion in public and private money to organize the Olympics — some estimates suggest $20 billion — and many games-related projects since then have been tied to corruption scandals that marred the games and drove up costs. Federal police and prosecutors have linked overpriced projects to graft between politicians and construction companies.A look at the fallout since the Olympics opened on Aug. 5:ADVERTISEMENT Carlos Nuzman, president of the organizing committee, was defeated earlier this year in an election to lead the Pan American Sports Organization. He ran on his record leading the Rio Olympics and finished third in a three-man race.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ “People have no dignity using public transportation in Rio de Janeiro,” she said.THE BADIn this July 16, 2017 photo, an empty parking lot is seen in front of the Athlete’s Village, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 3,600 apartments remain unoccupied. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)The Olympics left a half-dozen vacant sports arenas in the Olympic Park and 3,600 empty apartments in the boarded-up Olympic Village. Deodoro, a major complex of venues in the impoverished north, is shuttered behind iron gates.Standing across the street, Jose Mauricio Pehna de Souza was asked if Rio benefited from the Olympics.“I don’t think so, not us in Brazil,” he said.A $20 million golf course is struggling to find players and financing.A few dozen were on the course on a recent, sunny Saturday. The clubhouse is mostly unfurnished, and it costs non-Brazilians 560 reals ($180) for 18 holes and a cart.File – In this July 4, 2016 file photo, the Olympic Park of the 2016 Olympics is seen from the air, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Olympics left half-dozen vacant sports arenas in the Olympic Park, and 3,600 empty apartments in the vast, boarded-up Olympic Village. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)Organizers and the International Olympic Committee say Rio needs time to develop these venues, and faults Brazil’s deep recession for most of the problems.A prosecutor several months ago disputed this, saying the Olympic Park “lacked planning how to use white elephant” sports venues. Many were built as part of real estate deals that have yet to pan out.Juliana Solaira, a 30-year-old pharmacist who lives across from the park, called the space “an excellent legacy” but said “few people use it.” Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant “Here we see all this money spent,” she said. “Unfortunately, we see most of the arenas are closed. So I think it could have been used in a better way.”The park offers few amenities: no restaurants, no shade and nothing much to do except gawk at deserted arenas. City hall officials and the federal government say they’re planning an event for Aug. 5 to “fill all the arenas” for the day.THE UGLYIn this July 27, 2017 photo, trash lays on the coast of Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events.Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, its unwelcome stench often drifting along the highway from the international airport.“I think it’s gotten worse,” Brazil’s gold-medal sailor Kahena Kunze said in a recent interview. “There was always floating trash, but I see more and more. It’s no use hiding the trash because it comes back. I figured it would get worse because I haven’t seen anything concrete being done.”Avenida Brasil, the main north-south artery through the city, is a snarl of unfinished roads and express bus lanes, viaducts to nowhere and detours through miles (kilometers) of traffic cones.In this July 27, 2017 photo, children play with a foam board in the polluted Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)Some of the politicians behind the Olympics have been accused of graft, and organizers still owe creditors about $30 million to 40 million.Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who wept when Rio was awarded the games, was convicted last month on corruption charges and faces a 9 1/2-year prison term. He is appealing.Former Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes , the local moving force behind the Olympics, is being investigated for allegedly accepting at least 15 million reals ($5 million) in payments to facilitate construction projects tied to the games. He denies wrongdoing.Another early booster, former Rio state governor Sergio Cabral, is in jail on corruption charges. FILE – In this Aug. 20, 2016 file photo, Brazil’s Neymar kisses the ball before scoring the decisive penalty kick during the final match of the mens’s Olympic football tournament at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As Rio de Janeiro reels from corruption, rising crime and unfinished infrastructure, its residents can look no further than the iconic image of Neymar to remind them of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics that took place one year ago and the price they payed for hosting the games. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)RIO DE JANEIRO — Neymar kissed the ball, delivered a gold medal and then wept with other Brazilians.Look no further if you’re searching for an iconic image of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.ADVERTISEMENT National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress View comments FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ THE GOODIn this July 17, 2017 photo, a commuter waits for the next car at the Jardim Oceanico subway station, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Olympics left behind a new subway line extension, high-speed bus service, and an urban jewel: a renovated port area filled with food stands, musicians, and safe street life in city rife with crime. These probably would not have been built without the prestige of the Olympics. But the games also imposed deadlines and drove up the price. A state auditor’s report said the 9.7 billion real ($3 billion) subway was overbilled by 25 percent. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)The Olympics left behind a new subway line extension, high-speed bus service and an urban jewel: a renovated port area filled with food stands, musicians and safe street life in a city rife with crime.These probably would not have been built without the prestige of the Olympics. But the games also imposed deadlines and drove up the price. A state auditor’s report said the 9.7 billion real ($3 billion) subway was overbilled by 25 percent.Igor Silverio lives nearby the port in a favela — or shanytown — and came the other day to kick around a soccer ball with his two young boys. The area in his youth was known for decay and drunkenness.In this July 16, 2017 photo, Igor Silverio poses for a photo at Praca Maua in the renovated port area, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Before the Olympic Games the area was known for decay and drunkenness. Igor Silverio lives nearby the port in a favela, or shanytown, and came the other day to kick around a soccer ball with his two young boys. “For sure it’s better,” he said. But he added he “expected more from the Olympics.” (AP Photo/Renata Brito)“For sure it’s better,” he said. But, he added, he “expected more from the Olympics.”“From my point of view, the Olympics only benefited the foreigners. Local people themselves didn’t get much. The security situation isn’t good, the hospitals. I think these are investments that didn’t benefit many local people.”He said he skipped the Olympics because they were “too expensive” and located far away in the suburbs.Standing outside the new subway line, 57-year-old domestic worker Isa Trajano Fernandes said public transportation had improved but was still deficient.“When the Olympics were going on it was better, but then they let it slide,” she said.She complained about crowding on the new express buses and the lack of security. Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes “It’s the only medal that really mattered,” Salvador Gaeta said recently while cycling in the deserted Olympic Park. “Every Brazilian will remember it.”Other memories have faded at home since the Olympics opened a year ago. A few expectations were met, but many fell short of those promised by IOC President Thomas Bach and organizing committee head Carlos Nuzman.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBach boasted at the closing ceremony of “a Rio de Janeiro before, and a much better Rio de Janeiro after the Olympic Games.”Nuzman called Rio the next Barcelona, one of the cities clearly transformed by the games. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’last_img read more