Chelsea v Arsenal line-ups: Pedro and Batshuayi play

first_img Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebook Pedro starts for Chelsea in the Community Shield game at Wembley, where Michy Batshuayi leads the Blues attack.Pedro returns to action after suffering a facial injury during the recent friendly against Arsenal in China.Alvaro Morata is among the substitutes, as is fellow summer signing Antonio Rudiger and 19-year-old midfielder Kyle Scott.There is no Alexis Sanchez or Mesut Ozil for Arsenal, but new signing Alexandre Lacazette plays.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, David Luiz, Cahill; Moses, Fabregas, Kante, Alonso; Willian, Batshuayi, Pedro.Subs: Caballero, Rudiger, Christensen, Scott, Boga, Musonda, Morata.Arsenal: Cech; Holding, Mertesacker, Monreal; Bellerin, Elneny, Xhaka; Oxlade-Chamberlain; Welbeck, Iwobi; Lacazette.Subs: Ospina, Kolasinac, Willock, Nelson, Giroud, Maitland-Niles, Walcott.last_img read more

Turning up the media volume

first_imgThis article originally appeared on pagefour of South Africa Now, a six-pagesupplement to the Washington Postproduced on behalf of Brand South Africa.(Click to enlarge.)RELATED ARTICLES• New journalism centre for SU• Keeping the story of HIV alive in SA• Myths, reality and the World Cup• Tutu speaks out for press freedom• Rhodes hosts world journalism meetAnton HarberSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place.After decades of censorship – imposed silence over crucial areas of apartheid– the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening.First there were effectively no media laws at all, then the new Constitution, adopted in 1996, explicitly protected freedom of speech and media, excluding only propaganda for war, incitement to violence and hate speech.The new African National Congress (ANC) government had a positive policy to transform the media and rid it of its apartheid inheritance, encourage diversity and give a media voice to previously excluded communities.Newspapers went through a difficult time of consolidation, with some going out of business, but then there was a boom in tabloids, making this one of the few countries where newspaper sales went up in the early 21st century. Papers like the Daily Sun created a huge new set of newspaper readers, and gave voice to the working class, a voice which had been absent from mainstream media.Investigative journalism flourished, with exposés of every controversial aspect of South African life: bad governance, wasteful spending, white collar crime and social conditions. If the test of an effective watchdog media is that crooks and scoundrels sleep restlessly, then the South African newspapers passed with flying colours. No-one was spared: not even the national chief of police and the president’s personal financial adviser, both of whom were sentenced to prison after being exposed in the media.But media is a contested political area. Democracy not only means freedom of the media, but freedom to criticise, denounce and take issue with the media.Tough news coverage has brought accusations of unfairness, lack of balance and ethics and invasions of personal dignity and privacy. In a society with a long history of racial inequality, issues of dignity are particularly sensitive. These are not unique to South Africa, but they come against the background of a tense transition to democracy, a media often tainted by apartheid history, the fragility of a new social compact and a young government operating under difficult circumstances.This has led to intense debate about whether the media exercises enough responsibility along with its rights: in particular, how to balance freedom of speech against the right to dignity. A new secrecy Bill – intended to bring old apartheid law in line with the new constitution – is hotly contested amid accusations that it seeks to cast the net of secrecy too widely. The Bill is currently being debated in parliament.The ruling ANC has expressed its unhappiness with the newspapers’ system of self-regulation – an ombudsman and a press council – and proposes a statutory appeals tribunal, as recourse for those aggrieved by their treatment at the hands of journalists. They argue that editors have been too reluctant to apologise and correct when they get things wrong.The tribunal suggestion has increased the volume more than ever, with a host of civil society organisations, legal bodies, political parties, academics and institutions speaking out against it.That this proposal can be so hotly debated is itself a sign of a vigorous, open and healthily contested democracy. Clearly, South Africans are not going to give up any freedoms lightly. There is going to be a lot of noise around the right to make noise.Professor Anton Harber is the director of the journalism programme at the University of the Wiwatersrand. He is a former joint founder and editor of the Mail & Guardian newspaper.Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB), or read selected articles online:Powering towards a green economySouth Africa plans to build a massive $21.8-billion, 5 000 MW solar park in its semi-desert Northern Cape province as part of an aggressive push to grow its highly industrialised economy without increasing its carbon footprint.The everyday beauty of SowetoSouth African photographer Jodi Bieber has a special ability to bring out the beauty in the ordinary, even the disfigured. On the cover of Time magazine she made a mutilated Afghani girl look beautiful, and in her latest book Soweto she makes everyday township life shine.Launchpad to a billion consumersBy offering to acquire Massmart for some $4.2-billion, Wal-Mart has joined the parade of global companies looking to South Africa as a springboard into what is increasingly seen as the world’s last great investment frontier.A trek to the start of timeIt will probe the edges of our universe. It will be a virtual time machine, helping scientists explore the origins of galaxies. It’s the Square Kilometre Array, and South Africans are at the heart of its development.Brewing up a global brandMiller Lite. Tastes great. Less filling. And brought to you by world-beating South African company SABMiller.Looking south and east for growthAs the shift in global economic power gains momentum, South Africa’s trade is moving eastwards and southwards in a pattern that both reflects the worldwide trend and helps drive it, writes John Battersby.More than just a celluloid MandelaThere is a special bond between Hollywood actor Morgan Freeman and the man he played in the Clint Eastwood movie Invictus, South African statesman Nelson Mandela.Africa in the new world orderKgalema Motlanthe, South Africa’s deputy president, looks at how African economies’ resilient performance during the global financial crisis points to the continent’s new place in a changing world.Mining history for new solutionsMark Cutifani, CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company, examines why South Africa’s past is key to successfully doing business here in the future.Turning up the media volumeSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place. After decades of apartheid censorship, the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening, writes Anton Harber.A joule of an energy-efficient carSouth Africa, which builds BMWs and Mercedes Benzes for the US market, is in the thick of the race to deliver a truly practical – and stylish – electric car. Meet the Joule.South Africa: Time to believeThe forgiving philosophy of “ubuntu” helps explain how South Africa managed to transcend its turbulent apartheid past and create a unified democracy, writes Simon Barber.Finding sound real estate investmentSouth Africa’s post-apartheid transformation and new middle class are fuelling demand for affordable homes. For private equity fund International Housing Solutions, that means opportunity.My normal, crazy, mixed-up countrySouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Bring on the braaiAll South Africans love it – including Nobel peace prize-winning Desmond Tutu – and its rich, smoky smell floats over the country every Sunday. Celebrate the braai with our great recipe for making boerewors, traditional South African farmer’s sausage.last_img read more

Kentucky Coal Museum Goes Solar

first_imgResidential solar slow to catch onBluegrass Solar is about eight months old, and if the city of Benham has embraced solar energy with its planned municipal system, Sexton is still trying to get his residential business up to its full potential.“We started trying to focus on residential,” he said, “and we’ve had a lot of interest but not a lot of execution.”Bluegrass joined forces with a partner, Star Solar, and began offering leases and financing and now the company’s focus is on municipal installations. Its alliance with Star Solar has allowed the company to begin offering leasing, financing, and partnership agreements.“That should make it easier for homeowners to get on board,” he said. RELATED ARTICLES A Cloudy Future for CoalCoal Production Hits 35-Year LowWill Taxpayers Get Stuck With Coal’s Cleanup Tab?Can Solar Solve the Coal Problem?‘Clean Coal’ Plant Looks More Like a Boondoggle Sexton told GBA that the project may have raised a few eyebrows in town, but has generally been accepted by city residents.“Everybody sort of smiles and has a little laugh about it,” he told GBA. “But we’ve not been greeted with any animosity or anything. They just get a chuckle out of it. It’s a pretty good headline.”Even though the region has a long history of coal mining, the industry is not as powerful as it once was, Sexton said.“We’re just now kind of getting over that grief and starting to let go,” he said. “It’s certainly still in the roots and everything.”Even in its heyday, he added, coal mined in the area was mostly used in steel production, not coal-burning power plants. “We’re pretty big on metallurgical coal,” he said. “We weren’t really an energy producer anyway.” The exhibits inside are all about the glory days of coal, but it will be the solar panels on the roof that knock as much as $10,000 off the power bills for the Kentucky Coal Mining Museum.Housed in a former International Harvester commissary, the museum features exhibits detailing the history of coal mining in the city of Benham and surrounding parts of Harlan County, a bastion of mining in eastern Kentucky. The museum, which opened in 1994, is owned by Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College.The 60 kW solar array now being installed on the museum’s roof by Bluegrass Solar is part of a 250 kW system that will serve Benham’s municipal power grid. Bluegrass owner Tre Sexton said the project is being underwritten by “assorted philanthropic sources.” The 80-panel array is roughly half complete, Sexton told GBA, and could be wrapped up in another week or so.At a time when renewable energy advocates are squaring off against a president who has pledged to “put our miners back to work,” seeing solar come to the rescue of a coal museum is rich with irony. But money is money, and the college estimates energy bills now average about $2,100 a month, according to USA Today.last_img read more

4 die in wall collapse, life hit in flooded Vadodara

first_imgNDRF rescues people in Vadodara following flash floods due to heavy rainfall NDRF rescues people in Vadodara following flash floods due to heavy rainfallVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:4101:41  Incessant rainfall has caused the death of four people in a wall collapse in Vadodara, besides causing floods and affecting life in the city. Nearly 5,000 people from over two dozen low-lying areas were shifted by the NDRF (National Disaster Response Force). Most of the roads were completely inundated.The government has deployed nine teams of the NDRF, besides the Army and the State Disaster Response Force (SDRF) to evacuate people from areas along the Vishwamitri river that is flowing to the danger level mark.center_img According to the State Emergency Operation Center (SEOC), a total of five NDRF and four SDRF teams have been involved in rescue operations in addition to two columns of the Army and as many companies of the State Reserve Police (SRP).Additionally, district police and teams of fire brigade of Vadodara and Surat Municipal Corporations have been deployed for a major rescue operation in the city which had seen an extremely heavy downpour of 499 mm on Wednesday.The district authorities ordered the closure of all schools and colleges on Friday. The operations at the city airport were shut on Thursday.Waterlogging of tracksFlooding has disrupted traffic movement as the authorities shut down all eight bridges in the city. The Western Railway has cancelled over a dozen trains due to waterlogging of tracks.“Five teams of the NDRF have been airlifted from Pune to join the evacuation works in Vadodara. CM has deputed a team of senior bureaucrats from Gandhinagar to oversee rescue and relief works,” a Gujarat government release stated.More than one lakh food packets were distributed by the NDRF and police in localities submerged in knee-deep waters.According to Vadodara Collector Shalini Agrawal, water was not receding because of the opening of sluice gates of the Ajwa dam and inflow of more water due to rains in the catchment area of the Vishwamitri.Floodwaters have entered the Sayajibaug zoo and government-run SSG hospital, besides local markets.On Thursday evening, the State energy division restored power in some of the areas where supply was stopped after four dozen feeders were submerged. “We have restored power in some areas but still several areas are in dark,” a government official said.“Four labourers were killed in a wall collapse due to heavy rain in Chhani area of Vadodara,” Chief Minister Vijay Rupani said after holding a review meeting in capital Gandhinagar.last_img read more

Sikhs to serve langar to commemorate Olympics in London

first_imgWhile Fauja Singh, the 101-year-old marathon runner, carries the Olympic relay torch in London on July 21, the Sikhs would celebrate the occasion by organising a langar (community kitchen) along the road for public. They would serve free Roti Rolls at several key points along the Olympic torch route from Greenwich to Waltham Forest between 7 am to 8 pm.Fauja, the oldest torch bearer at London 2012, would carry the Torch on the 64th day of the Olympic Torch Relay when it reaches Newham. The Olympic Stadium is also located at Newham.The langar would be organized by United Sikhs, an organization dedicated to promoting the Sikh identity and tenets. “We are proud to share with the public the 500 year old Sikh tradition of serving free meals,” said Parvinder Kaur, who would manage the langar project.She said the Sikhs from the UK and around the world would be participating in celebrations. They would show the world how the community embraced diversity.”We hope to demonstrate through Langar how the community involves in selfless service. We will be serving thousands of free vegetarian meals along the route,” she said, adding “It would also showcase how community food can bring people from all walks of life together.”Paul Uppal, MP for Wolverhampton South West, meanwhile said that he always believed in promoting the big society as a Sikh and as a Conservative. “I am looking forward to seeing Gurdwaras from all over the country come together to serve others in the name of faith and community.”advertisementThe people serving the langar would also be branded in yellow t-shirts carrying Fauja Singhs image. The langar would be served at several service points in each of the five boroughs, each serving at least 1,000 vegetarian roti rolls within two hours.Fifteen furdwaras from South and East London already granted their consent for participating in the event. The organisation also demonstrated how to prepare roti-rolls, an improvised version of cooked mixed veg filled in rotis made of whole wheat flour and plain flour. An executive chef already apprised the volunteers how to prepare roti rolls.United Sikh also invited gurdwaras from Scotland and Wales to partner with the London gurdwaras to set up more langar service points. The sources said several Sikh from India have also been planning to reach London to support the project.last_img read more

Bar Refaeli wants $10,000 donations to make sex tape

first_imgSupermodel Bar Refaeli has reportedly appealed to her fans to donate 10,000 dollars so she can make her very own sex tape. Obviously the whole thing is just a joke for a new video from comedy website FunnyOrDie.com.I know what youre thinking,?? the Mirror quoted the Sports Illustrated swimsuit model as saying in the video.Who would watch that? Im not sure myself. But maybe a small audience might want to watch me have sex. After all, Im really good at it,?? she says.In the video, she said, “Hi, my name is Bar, and Im currently working as a model and actress – you know, just to pay the bills – but I need your help to make my real dream to come true. I want to make a sex tape.??Just to be clear, this would be a tape of me having sex with some dude, in many different sex positions, for at least a few hours,?? she said.In the video, she offers some incentives if the donation is made through Kickstarter (the donations website) – for 50 dollars you get an autographed picture of her having sex, if youre into that kind of thing??, for 200 dollars you can visit the set of the sex tape if you have time?? and for 1,000 dollars, shell put you in the running to be in the film.last_img read more

Dr. Davies Pushes for New Road Traffic Act This Year

first_imgMinister of Transport, Works and Housing, Dr. the Hon. Omar Davies, says he is working assiduously to ensure that the new Road Traffic Act is passed in 2013.The amended Act will ensure that road safety issues are addressed according to 21st century requirements. It will, among other things, deal with the use of mobile phones while driving, and also cover the use of in-car devices such as DVD players.“It’s an enormous document. It needs to be coordinated through (the various departments of government)… which are involved, and so there is an overlapping for which we need to ensure that there is a consistency. But my plan is to have that taken through Parliament and passed during this Parliamentary year,” Dr. Davis said.He was addressing a handing-over ceremony for six road safety infomercials on Tuesday (January 8) at the Insurance Company of the West Indies’ (ICWI) head offices in New Kingston.[RELATED: Traffic Investigators to be Trained in Crash Reconstruction]The Transport Minister said once the new Act is passed, driving schools and instructors will be required to be certified by the Island Traffic Authority and adhere to an approved curriculum, which will address issues such as defensive driving. He noted that motorists, who are in breach, may also be required to attend courses.The six road safety infomercials, which address a number of crucial issues affecting road safety in Jamaica, were handed-over to the Ministry of Transport by the ICWI.The areas covered by the infomercials are: pedestrian safety; motorcycle safety; overtaking; speeding; tailgating; and safe driving on the whole.last_img read more

Gov’t Making Use of ICT in Fighting Crime

first_imgMinister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting, says the Ministry is taking full advantage of the offerings of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in combating crime across the island.Making his contribution to the 2013/14 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on June 19, Mr. Bunting noted that a number of crime control and prevention initiatives have been implemented with the use of modern technology.Among these is the recent upgrading of the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s (JCF) Automated Palm and Fingerprint Identification System (APFIS) at a cost of $260 million.Mr. Bunting noted that the modernisation exercise involves, in part, the conversion of the remaining paper-based fingerprint records to digital format.In addition, the Blackberry (smart phone) law enforcement database has been installed on some 550 handsets of traffic and operational personnel across the island and the smart phone application has been used to check the authenticity of drivers’ licences and motor vehicle documents.The analogue police radio system will be converted to a digital system with enhanced capabilities at a cost of $240 million.Mr. Bunting further informed that the JCF will be expanding surveillance via closed circuit television (CCTV) during the next financial year to detect criminal offences in public spaces.He said the necessary equipment has already been installed in several towns including Mandeville, May Pen, Montego Bay, and Half-Way-Tree.“We will be expanding the use of this facility by increasing the number of cameras in existing towns and, will also expand the surveillance to include areas of Spanish Town,” he said.Contact: Athaliah Reynolds-Bakerlast_img read more