Live Events ordered to disclose all assets and earnings

Though the Directors of the Company had represented to the ticket holders by making a public statement admitting the companies serious breaches including serious lapses of security and agreed to compensate the ticket holders, none of the same has been effected yet according to Premathiratne. The District Court of Colombo in the case filed by Attorney at Law Nishan Premthiratne for damages for serious breaches at the recently concluded Enrique Concert, ordered Live Events Pvt Ltd to disclose all assets held by the Company and the total earnings made from the ticket sales from the ” Enrique Iglasius – Sex and Love” concert held in December 2015.Premathiratne and his wife have filed two separate cases seeking for damages on the serious failures which had been caused to them owing to the substandard concert organized by the Company. The managing Director or chairman or directors are required to provide answers within 10 days. The Directors of Live Events include include Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jayawardena. (Colombo Gazette) Premathiratne was represented by Presidents Counsel Kuvera de Zoysa, Attorneys at Law Amrit Rajapakse, Kushan Illangathilake , Niranjan de Silva, Nadun Wijesiriwardena, Yasith Hirimburegama and Janith Fernando instructed by Sanjay Fonseka. read more

UN refugee agency says Turkish asylumseekers at sea deserve hearings

“Returning an asylum-seeker to his country of origin without hearing his or her claim is against the fundamental principles of international refugee law and may amount to refoulement,” the refugee agency’s spokesman, Rupert Colville, said, referring to the illegal eviction of a refugee. The spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said that under European Union (EU) law, Italy would appear to be responsible for assessing the claims of the asylum-seekers, thought to be 11 men and two boys. Under the terms of the EU Dublin Regulation, the 13 should be able to disembark from the Antigua and Barbuda-registered Lydia Oldendorff in Malta and then be transferred to Italy, Mr. Colville added. Alternatively, the owner, who flew to Malta, has said that he would be prepared to send his ship back to Italy, providing he received clear assurances within the next 36 hours from the Italian authorities that the 13 can disembark. Mr. Colville said the situation aboard the vessel is “extremely tense” because of the limited quarters for the 13 asylum-seekers, 16 crew members and four newly hired security guards. At least one of the men reportedly has attempted suicide. He urged Malta and Italy “to act in accordance with their responsibilities under international law without further delay.” read more

Brock researcher on team that studies how fish keeps cool

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the … water?This is what one particular fish does when its home in tropical mangroves get “too hot for comfort,” a recent research team that included Brock biologist Glenn Tattersall has shown.Tiny, silver amphibious fish called the mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus), which look a bit like miniature sardines, were long known to jump out of the waters where they live, located in swamps from the southern United States to Brazil.Tattersall and the research team, led by biologist Patricia Wright at Guelph University, reared the mangrove rivulus fish for one year in water that was either at 25 or 30°C.Then, a webcam recorded the fish’s behaviour and body temperature as the researchers slowly raised the water temperature. The scientists were testing for two things: the temperature at which the fish would jump out of the water to avoid the heat; and whether or not being raised in different water temperatures would affect how much heat the fish could stand.The researchers found the fish jumped out of the water at around 35°C regardless of the water temperature at which they were raised.The team also wanted to know how quickly the fish’s body temperature cooled under various environmental conditions once the fish was out of the water.To do this, researchers had the fish jump onto filter papers that had varying degrees of humidity. The bodies of all fish started cooling in as little as 30 seconds and were cooler than the filter paper within one minute. The less humid the filter paper, the cooler were the fish, regardless of air temperature.“These results provide evidence of behavioural avoidance of high temperatures and the first quantification of evaporative cooling in an amphibious fish,” concludes the paper, a “flexibility that may be important for tropical amphibious fishes under increasing pressures from climatic change.”Tattersall said for the study, the fish were returned to the water so they didn’t die.“That’s the whole point of the study. If the water is too hot, they know to jump out and then they cool off since evaporation on land occurs. But they go back and forth between aquatic and terrestrial environments,” he said.He noted that Wright has studied the fish after they jump out of the water in her lab and found they can survive for 20 days out of water.The team’s research, titled “Out of the frying pan into the air—emersion behaviour and evaporative heat loss in an amphibious mangrove fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus),” was published in late October in the journal Biology Letters.Fish that can take advantage of evaporative cooling may have an evolutionary advantage over fully aquatic fish in coming years as coastal waters warm because of climate change, the researchers suggest.Mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus) read more