See Eurostar Sights With VR Odyssey Experience

first_imgStay on target As a two-time Eurostar rider, I can say with some level of authority that the high-speed railway is, indeed, a great way to travel: comfy seats, available Wi-Fi, express trips to Paris and Brussels.But there is one thing the service is missing: windows.“Travellers are always asking if they can see the fish when traveling through the Channel Tunnel,” Eurostar Commercial Director Nick Mercer said in a statement.Well, now you can.The enterprise on Wednesday announced “Eurostar Odyssey,” a virtual experience designed to take passengers on an immersive adventure through the surrounding sea.“Throughout the summer we’ll be giving younger travellers free headsets so they can enjoy an exciting adventure under the Channel,” according to Mercer, who did not reveal an age limit for use (which, therefore, means I will most definitely put in a request).Simply log into the onboard entertainment system on your personal Apple or Android device, then sit back and relax as the “Odyssey” experience turns your train ride into a deep-sea dive.As the virtual roof transforms into a glass ceiling, you’ll meet explorers Rose and Benoit, who guide users on a journey filled with pirate legends and mermaid encounters. A gaming element, meanwhile, adds a bit of competition.Meet Esther the octopus (via Eurostar)From Oceanarium to the mysterious HMS Victory to the Abyss, keep your eyes peeled for different species—including Esther the octopus, who guards the sunken ship’s treasure.“Eurostar Odyssey” is available on new e320 and refurbished e300 trains running between London and Paris, Lille, Brussels, Lyon, and the south of France.The Channel Tunnel (or Chunnel, as I prefer to call it) is a 31.35-mile rail tunnel below the English Channel that links the United Kingdom with the rest of Europe. At its lowest point, the passage sits 250 feet below the sea bed, and 380 feet below sea level.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. British Airways Tests VR Entertainment on Select First-Class FlightsGeek Pick: HP Reverb Is Clear-Eyed Virtual Reality last_img read more

Dragon Ball FighterZ Open Beta Has a Ton of Fighters Stages and

first_img No, Solid Snake Isn’t Coming to ‘Tekken’Watch These Fighting Games at EVO 2019 Dragon Ball FighterZ — aka the Dragon Ball Z fighting game you’ve always wanted — releases at the end of the month. To prepare folks for what is sure to be one of 2018’s biggest titles, Bandai Namco is holding an open beta next week. Unlike last summer’s closed beta, this open beta is feature rich; with a lot of characters and stages to choose from. It also has a nice variety of modes, giving players a good idea of what to expect in the final product.New characters include Beerus, Nappa, and Adult Gohan. Goku, Kid Buu, Android 18, Frieza, Cell, Krillin, Vegeta, and Piccolo were available in the closed beta. Selectable stages include Planet Namek, World Tournament Arena, West City, Volcano, Wasteland, Cell Games Arena, and Rocky Fields (evening). Expect a practice mode along with World Match and a Replay Channel. Other features include Stamps, rankings, lobby avatar customization, and two “dramatic” scenes.EARLY ACCESS for FighterZ who pre-ordered digitally on X1 or PS4. Starts Jan. 13 from midnight to 11:59pm PST!Open Beta for ALL starts Jan.14 at midnight & ENDS at 11:59pm PST on the 15th!#DBFighterzBETAPre-order your copy: https://t.co/qBSpAZa7qh pic.twitter.com/6kW8DO4LQc— Bandai Namco US (@BandaiNamcoUS) January 9, 2018The open beta kicks off on January 14 at 12 am PST and concludes on January 16, 12 am PST. Those who’ve pre-ordered the game can get in on the action a day early on January 13, 12 am PST.Personally speaking, I’m glad they’ve included a practice mode this time around. This is a perfect way to try out combos and super moves without getting bodied during a live match. I also like the large number of playable characters. The closed beta was only available during specific times of day. Considering Bandai Namco didn’t list any times, we have to assume the open beta will be available to play at any time during the two (or three) days the beta is live.Dragon Ball FighterZ releases on January 26th for PC, PS4, and Xbox One. You can pre-order it now from Amazon. Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.center_img Stay on targetlast_img read more

Lasers keep mini helicopter hovering for hours

first_img Success in ‘space elevator’ competition (Update 3) Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Seattle research and development company LaserMotive has succeeded in keeping a model helicopter hovering for six hours, powered only by the energy of a laser. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Conventional unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are limited in their flying time because of the fuel or batteries they carry. Operation times can be extended if solar power is used in conjunction with batteries, as in Qinetiq’s ultralight Zephyr, which has been able to fly for 82 hours. Solar Impulse, a Swiss company, has also demonstrated solar powered piloted craft.Unmanned vehicles used by the military tend to be stronger and heavier than ultralights, and it is difficult to power them with solar power because of their greater energy requirements, and this is where LaserMotive hopes to provide a solution.The laser-powered model helicopter, which weighed only 22 grams, was demonstrated at Denver, Colorado last week at the AUVSI Unmanned Systems Conference. The tethered, radio-controlled model helicopter was powered by an array of semiconductor-diode near-infrared lasers, which produced laser beams that were then focused down to a single beam seven centimeters in diameter. The beam, which will not damage eyes, tracked the helicopter automatically and illuminated the helicopter’s photovoltaic (PV) cells, which were optimized for the laser’s wavelength. The PV cells then converted around 50 percent of the laser power to electricity, providing just a few watts, but enough to keep the helicopter rotors spinning.Tom Nugent, president, CEO and co-founder of LaserMotive, said he believed the six hour limit was set by the quality of the motor that drives the helicopter rotors, since it was only a small brush motor not designed to run continuously for that long. The tiny model flies under laser power until the motor burns out, he said. Nugent also said he expected the system could be scaled to “anything anybody is interested in.” An unmanned vehicle could fly missions and return to recharge over the laser, or could hover over a laser base for lengthy periods. LaserMotive demonstrated the use of lasers to power robots wirelessly last year, when it won the $900,000 Power Beaming Challenge sponsored by NASA for using a laser to power a robot climbing a 900-meter-long cable suspended from a full-scale helicopter. center_img Citation: Lasers keep mini helicopter hovering for hours (2010, September 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-09-lasers-mini-helicopter-hours.html Multi-mission UAV, recharging in between missions. Image credit: LaserMotive More information: LaserMotive – lasermotive.com/ The power beaming prize winnings could enable the company to help in powering space elevators to lift objects into orbit in the future, but such elevators are still at the concept stage. Other possible applications include delivering emergency power in disaster situations and to forward military bases or remote rural communities.UAVs are among the fastest growing sectors in the aerospace industry and in defense, and the global market is expected to grow from the current $4.9 billion to $11.5 billion within ten years, according to industry analysts the Teal Group.last_img read more

Archeologists unearth eight Bronze Age boats at British Quarry

first_img © 2013 Phys.org More information: Cambridge Archaeological Unit: www-cau.arch.cam.ac.uk/index.htmvia Independent, Telegraph, Guardian. Explore further (Phys.org) —Archeologists from Cambridge Archaeological Unit have unearthed 8 Bronze Age wood boats from a quarry in Britain. The boats are believed to have been carved by people living in the area approximately three thousand years ago and were for unknown reasons buried intentionally. Citation: Archeologists unearth eight Bronze Age boats at British Quarry (2013, June 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-archeologists-unearth-bronze-age-boats.htmlcenter_img The quarry is approximately 150 miles north of London in an area near Peterborough called Cambridgeshire—its owned and operated by Hanson UK (who is also funding the excavation) and is part of Must Farm, a brick making company. The boats were first found in 2011—since that time, excavators have dug them out of the dry (River Nene) bed and transported them to another archeology site—Flag Fen—for preservation processing. The boats are currently being housed in a cold storage facility to prevent the wood from rotting. Visitors that wish to view the work can peer through windows.The boats were all carved from single tree trunks (six oak, one alder and one lime) and range in size from small single person watercraft to large vessels capable of carrying up to 20 people or a tonne of cargo. Researchers working on the project suspect the boats were all sunk intentionally because the transoms had been removed and were not found at the site. Transoms are flat thin boards that fit into slots at the rear of boats. When in the slots they prevent water from entering the boats—when removed, they allow the boat to fill and sink. To sink the Bronze Age boats would have required extra effort however, as they were made of nothing but wood. The research team doesn’t know why the boats were sunk or why they were never recovered.The area near where the boats were found came to be naturally flooded approximately 4000 years ago, necessitating adaption by the people who lived there. Archeological evidence suggests they learned to carve boats out of tree trunks and used them to move around, to transport goods and animals and of course to catch food.All of the boats have been well preserved and represent the largest number of Bronze Age boats ever found at one location. The archeologists studying them report that all of the boats were heavily used and most show signs of having been repaired. One also sported etched criss-cross patterns inside and out. Swimming-pool ships make waves in modular robotics (w/ Video) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

New polymer can shapeshift into multiple forms w video

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2016 Phys.org In the recent past, material scientists have come up with polymers that change from one shape to another when heated or cooled—the main drawback for them has been that they can only be programmed to take one or two shapes. In this new effort, the researchers have come up with a polymer that is capable of forming itself into many different shapes, by combing two ingredients—one that has elastic deformation properties and the other that has plastic deformation properties. Current polymers tend to have the former property, which is useful for some limited applications. But what has really been needed, the team notes, is a polymer capable of plastic deformation, where it is re-shaped permanently without having to resort to melting—due to covalent bond exchange.To make the polymer, the researchers added the chemical 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene to an elastic material known as crosslinked poly (caprolactone) , the result was a plastic that had a low transitive temperature (55˚C) and a high deformation temperature (130˚C). The new material can be programmed by physically pushing the material into different shapes at different temperatures. To make them come about on demand, the material is subjected to the temperature that corresponds with the shape that is desired. The group created several such polymers and demonstrated that it was possible to cause the same piece of material to fold itself into first one shape, then another—in one such example a material was first caused to revert to an origami boat and then to revert to an origami flower. New self-stretching material developed (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Zhejiang University in China has developed a new type of polymer that can be caused to revert to multiple different forms on demand. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they came up with the new polymer, how it works and the uses to which it might be put. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Journal information: Science Advances Shape manipulation via thermally distinct elasticity and plasticity. (A) Smart origami structures. (B) Smart kirigami structure. Credit: Dr. Qian Zhao and Dr. Tao Xiecenter_img Play Recovery from an origami boat into an origami bird with infrared heating. Credit: Dr. Qian Zhao and Dr. Tao Xie The team reports that in addition to a high degree of programmability the polymer also demonstrated toughness—it could be caused to change in to multiple different shapes over and over again without cracking or degrading. They believe the new material could likely be used in medical applications, in shape-shifting electronics, or perhaps aboard spacecraft. Citation: New polymer can shape-shift into multiple forms (w/ video) (2016, January 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-polymer-shape-shift-multiple-video.html Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Recovery from an origami plane into an origami bird with infrared heating. Credit: Dr. Qian Zhao and Dr. Tao Xie More information: Q. Zhao et al. Shape memory polymer network with thermally distinct elasticity and plasticity, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501297AbstractStimuli-responsive materials with sophisticated yet controllable shape-changing behaviors are highly desirable for real-world device applications. Among various shape-changing materials, the elastic nature of shape memory polymers allows fixation of temporary shapes that can recover on demand, whereas polymers with exchangeable bonds can undergo permanent shape change via plasticity. We integrate the elasticity and plasticity into a single polymer network. Rational molecular design allows these two opposite behaviors to be realized at different temperature ranges without any overlap. By exploring the cumulative nature of the plasticity, we demonstrate easy manipulation of highly complex shapes that is otherwise extremely challenging. The dynamic shape-changing behavior paves a new way for fabricating geometrically complex multifunctional devices.last_img read more

Sahitya Akademi

first_imgBooker-Nominated Jeet Thayil and Bengali novelist Subrata Mukhopadhyaya were among 24 authors selected for this year’s Sahitya Akademi Awards, which was dominated by poets. Twelve of the 24 awards went to works of poets, which included K Sachitandandan (Marannu Vacha Vazhikal), late Bal Krishna ‘Bhaura’ (Tim-Tim Karde Tare) and Makhan Lal Kanwal (Yath Aangnaz Manz).Thayil, whose novel Narcopolis was shortlisted for Booker Prize, was selected for his poetry collection Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’These Errors are Correct in English category.The Akademi said 12 books of poetry, six short story collections, four novels and one each of autobiography and criticism were selected for the awards this year, two of them posthumously.The awards were given to books first published between January 2008 and December 2010. The award carries Rs 1 lakh cash, engraved copper plaque and a shawl.Among the poets, other winners are Guneswar Musahary (Boro Khonthai Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix), Chandrakant Devtale (Pathar Fenk Raha Hoon), H S Shivaprakash (Mabbina Haage Kabniveyassi), Kashinath Shamba Lolienkar (Kavyasutra) and Darsan Buttar (Maha Kambani). Aaidan Singh Bhatti (Aankh Hinye Ra Hariyal Sapana), Ramji Thakkura (Laghupadhyaprhbandhatrayi) and Krishna Kumar Toor (Ghurfa-I-Ghalib) are the other poets who were selected for the award.Assamese writer Chandana Goswami was selected for her novel Patkair Ioare More Desh while Mukhopadhyaya was selected for his fiction Birasan. Other novelists are Jodha C Sanasam (Mathou Kanba DNA) and D Selvaraj (Thol).In Gujarati, Chandrakant Topiwala’s critical study Gujarati Sakshibhasya was selected for the award while in Maithili Shefalika Verma’s autobiography Kist-Kist Jeewan won the award.Six short story collections also won the award. Jayant Pawar’s Marathi collection Phoenixchya Rakhetun Uthala Mor, Uday Thulung’s Ekantvas (Nepali), Gourahari Das’s Kanta O’ Anyanya Galpa (Odia), Gangadhar Hansda’s Banchaw Akan Goj Hor (Santali), Late Indra Vaswani’s Miteea Khaan Miteea Taaeen (Sindi) and Peddibhotla Subbaramaiah’s Kathalu Vol 1 (Telugu) were the winners in this category.last_img read more

A journey shared on canvas

first_imgSharing the experience of 40 years, artist Niren Sengupta is ready with his solo exhibition titled Sublimity- A Painter’s Quest. The show will display forty works of the painter created at different points of his journey through the years.The artist invokes motifs from animal world, birds, contemporary life, picturesque sightings and spiritual existences. Lord Krishna, Lord Rama,  Lord Buddha and monks dance on his canvases in ecstasy and bliss. He believes that art is an expression of inner language. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The subjects are varied which he treated differently at different points of his journey. He deploys the idea of shringar from Natyashastra Shastra in every painting. He moves beyond the trance to the romance with maturing figures’ thought and struggle. The artist seems to have given enough thinking space to the spectator to understand the mood of the painting.The paintings deal with abstracts followed by the saranagata series (surrender to the divine). They are linked in more than one ways. His abstracts have a perspective and the natural force. The works are more an example of light and shade, and competing movements of organic wings and boat-like contrasts against blues, reds and mauve background.Where: Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi RoadWhen: Till 7 AugustTimings: 11 am to 8 pmlast_img read more

Colours of concern

first_imgCommemorating the 107th birth anniversary of Shaheed Bhagat Singh, an event was organised in the Capital that honoured some eminent personalities with the Shaheed Bhagat Singh Bravery/Memorial Award for their remarkable contribution to the society. The function was organised by Society for Shaheed Bhagat Singh Help and Care on 27 September at Shah Auditorium. Satish Kaushik was the chief guest for the evening where a cultural-event with the theme Mera Rang de Basanti Chola also featured. Children of different age groups participated in the show.The event also marked the presence of other guests – Asha Devi and Badrinath Singh (Parents of Nirbhaya), Col. Sanjay Sehgal (Snr. Officer, Civil Defence), Michael N George and Uma Shanker (recipient of National Bravery Award) and many others.last_img read more

Dystopian attraction of Stalin era

first_imgSome of the most memorable, enduring literature has been inspired by history’s bloodiest eras – the French Revolution, trench warfare in World War I, the Spanish Civil War, the Nazi killings, the partition of India and its dangerous dislocations, the Cambodian, the Rwandan genocides and so on. But these are not only intended as harrowing records of those turbulent times but a warning against their recurrence. So is it about the Stalin era with its pervasive paranoia and fear, violent purges, mass repression, ‘justice’ dealt on torture-achieved confessions and denunciations, historical manipulation – and an over-arching personality cult. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Stalin succeeded Lenin in 1924 but it was only a decade later that the terror began. The Great Purge, targeting all institutions and supplanting any rival, would continue till 1940, when perforce halted by World War II, resume afterwards – though in smaller scale – and end only with his death in 1953. Though it was first officially acknowledged in Khrushchev’s Secret Speech at the 20th Party Congress in 1956, some authors had brought some aspects to public attention much earlier. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThere are some indications in Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita but the first published record is Hungarian-born British writer Arthur Koestler’s Darkness at Noon (1940), the account of an old Bolshevik’s arrest for ‘treason’, torture for ‘confession’ and eventual execution. Though the character is called Rubashov, he may well be named Bukharin, Zinoviev, Kamenev or any other of Lenin’s old associates eliminated in the purges.George Orwell’s allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945) is a sharp attack on Stalin’s rise and reign, while the more terrifying, dystopian 1984 (1949) has, as the state’s figurehead, the dark-eyed, heavy moustachioed Big Brother (an unmistakable description).Then there is Ilya Ehrenburg’s The Thaw (1954) – the first Russian work to allude to Stalinist terror, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962) influencing other books on gulag existence.Even well into the new century and far from Russia, the period still attracts authors and has led to some engrossing works which recapture the tense, perilous atmosphere. The pride of place must go to Simon Sebag-Montefiore’s Sashenka (2008) and One Night in Winter (2013), both loosely linked with some common characters, both real and fictional.Sashenka begins in Tsarist St Petersburg in 1916 when the eponymous heroine – a willful teenager – spurns her privileged background to join the Bolsheviks and ends up as a secretary to Lenin. In 1939, she is long married to a leading figure of the regime, who survived the purge and is so trusted that one night Stalin and his entourage drop in for dinner.But one moment of indiscretion is all needed to unravel her and her family’s life. In the third part set in the 1990s, some dedicated researchers, funded by an Russian oligarch, uncover her shocking fate and that of her two children.One Night in Winter, set in World War II’s aftermath, is no less stomach-wrenching as the escapades of a bunch of a privileged teenagers go tragically wrong and enmesh their parents – all members of the ruling elite – in a relentless witch-hunt, powered by a power struggle between rival intelligence chiefs – Beria and Abakumov. The teenagers have to inform on each other and their parents while their siblings as young as six and 10 years are also picked up and threatened. Meanwhile, the parents have to go on as nothing has happened.Another view of the claustrophobic times and the innumerable pitfalls – especially for a honest man – is offered in William Ryan’s series about a mid-1930s Moscow police captain, probing a range of criminal cases – all with sinister political ramifications and perils galore for the investigator. Debuting in The Holy Thief (2010) where a murder case grows complicated once it is found the woman victim is American, Captain Alexei Dimitrevich Korolev is next sent to a film location in Ukraine (The Bloody Meadow, 2011) to probe the ‘suicide’ of a woman – reportedly in a relationship with then NKVD chief Yezhov. Then he has to investigate a killing of scientists right in view of the Kremlin in The Twelfth Department (2012), while trying to ensure the safety of his family from the state.Stalin prominently features in the Inspector Pekkala series by American author Paul Watkins (pen name Sam Eastland) but these deserve separate treatment for a most innovative treatment of the era and his depiction – ranging from almost reasonable to painfully paranoid and untrustworthy. On the other hand, readers interested in historical treatment could pick up Sebag-Montefiore’s Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar (2005) and Orlando Figes’ The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia (2007).last_img read more

Thoughts on fire

first_imgChromatic Statement is a group show of four women artistes from Delhi who work intensively in their own styles and present their creative statement through impressive canvases painted in their own colours be it monochromatic approach by Manju Narain or using selected colour palette like Anita Trehan and Neera Dabar or like Neeru Suri’s sculptural representation. This show, to be held from February 21 to March 20 presents the unseen thoughts and emotions which can only be expressed by an artistic hand with a sensible handling of artistic techniques exploring various mediums. The exhibition is to be held at Studio 55 at Sunder Nagar in the Capital. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Creativity is a matchless quality which comes from within. It is a special thing human beings are blessed with. Human urge to express deep thoughts is inevitable and through the ages art has been the best way to present those extraordinary views. The nature and things around us always inspire us to enrich our thoughts.Manju Narain is a sensitive and introspective artiste with a penchant for the unusual and thought provoking images. Her works depicting strange innocent beings wistfully brings about illustrative fairytale creatures, trapped silently within claustrophobic gardens and troubling mazes, as if striving for some means of escape and true expression. Manju’s attempts to express her genuine reactions and observations are her own personal path towards Catharsis. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixNira Davar uses mystique colours to create her own dreamland. Her approach colourful yet subdued representation of thoughts. Her works are full of energy and charm. Soothing and gentle forms without much of sharp contrast her canvases are very welcoming.Anita Trehan played with human forms using a selective colour palette. Her mature presentation reflects a skilful forte of an artist. She takes the viewers in a special journey towards unknown mindscape of human beings through her canvases leaving a lot of space for imagination and intuition.Neeru Suri depicts various moods and forms of women, which is very close to her heart. Metal is her favourite medium to work with and she loves to explore a woman’s life and her different roles and represent it in her own form experimenting imagination.Chromatic Statement brings a collection of works which are meaningful, thought provoking and igniting.When: Feb 21 to  March 20Where: Studio 55, 55, Sunder Nagarlast_img read more