Letterkenny students receive UCD scholarships

first_imgThere were many proud moments for two Letterkenny students and their families at the UCD Entrance Scholar Awards on Thursday.Diarmuid Ó Cathail and Aisling Ní Fhearáin, both past pupils of Coláiste Ailigh, were awarded entrance scholarships to the university for the new academic year.Diarmuid received a scholarship under Scéim na Gaeilge and Aisling received an entry scholarship based on her fantastic leaving certificate results. The students were joined by proud family members and Mícheál Ó Giobúin, the principal of Coláiste Ailigh, to celebrate the achievements. Coláiste Ailigh principal Mícheál Ó Giobúin with Aisling Ní Fhearáin having received her entry scholarship to UCD.Coláiste Ailigh principal Mícheál Ó Giobúin with Diarmuid Ó Cathail having received his scholarship under Scéim na Gaeilge. Letterkenny students receive UCD scholarships was last modified: November 18th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Why Kevin Durant leaving the Warriors excites Draymond Green

first_imgIn some ways, Draymond Green is pleased Kevin Durant left the Warriors for Brooklyn via free agency this summer.He’s happy for Durant, still a good friend, who got to exercise his right to decide where he wanted to play basketball. And, more oddly, Green is actually thrilled about the Warriors being an underdog again after a five-year stay as the NBA’s overwhelming favorites.Speaking with ESPN’s Rachel Nichols in a wide-ranging interview Wednesday, Green talked about how Durant’s decision …last_img

Shrink Validity Is Shrinking

first_img(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Should you trust the diagnosis of a psychiatrist?  If it helps, individuals are free to choose.  Behind the scenes, however, there are severe, deep-seated debates about whether professional shrinks understand disorders, let alone diagnose them properly.In New Scientist, James Davies reported about protests at the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) annual meeting.  Some protestors feel that psychiatry is “not even wrong”; psychiatrists don’t know what they are doing, and sometimes end up abusing patients:The demonstration aimed to highlight the harm the protesters believe psychiatry is perpetrating in the name of healing. One concern is that while psychiatric medications are more widely prescribed than almost any drugs in history, they often don’t work well and have debilitating side effects. Psychiatry also professes to respect human rights, while regularly treating people against their will. Finally, psychiatry keeps expanding its list of disorders without solid scientific justification.That list includes major changes with each new edition of the psychiatry “bible,” the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).  Edition V is coming out, loaded with new maladies that were never diagnosed before, and altering the description of other disorders – changes that can have major effects on prescriptions, insurance policies and scientific “explanations” for various behaviors.Davies said that some psychiatrists who filed past the protestors acknowledged that they had some legitimate concerns.In another article on New Scientist, “Trials highlight worrying flaws in psychiatry ‘bible’,” Peter Aldhous focused on flaws in tests that psychiatrists use to diagnose mental illness.  “While for some diagnoses reliability was good, others yielded scores little better than chance,” he said.  Some of the worst results concerned some of the most common diagnoses:The conditions with questionable reliability include subtly altered descriptions of two of the most common diagnoses in psychiatry: major depressive disorder and generalised anxiety disorder. That has opened a can of worms, leaving some mental health professionals wondering about the reliability of even established psychiatric diagnoses.The final wording of DSM-5, scheduled for publication in May 2013, will have profound effects on people’s lives. The manual not only helps determine who is given psychoactive drugs, but in the US may determine whether treatment is covered by health insurance. Some diagnoses are even used to justify holding people indefinitely in secure mental hospitals.There are others that Aldhous worried about: diagnoses of autism, and an alleged precursor of schizophrenia dubbed “attenuated psychosis syndrome.”  Psychiatrists use a value called kappa that is supposed to measure the “the consensus between different doctors assessing the same patient, with 1 corresponding to perfect diagnostic agreement, and 0 meaning concordance could just be due to chance.”  Unfortunately, chance could not be ruled out as a hypothesis for some of the most common disorders.  For instance, regarding attenuated psychosis syndrome, “While field trials gave a kappa of 0.46, the variability was so large that Darrel Regier, APA’s head of research, told the meeting that the result was “uninterpretable”.One theory escape mechanism for the questionable reliability of “major depressive disorder” and “generalized anxiety disorder” diagnoses was to suggest that depression and anxiety are like the “fevers” of a deeper mental disorder whose symptoms can mask a variety of conditions.  Aldhous did not seem impressed; “if depression and anxiety can’t be reliably diagnosed, many patients will wonder how many more disorders stand on similarly shaky ground.”For more on problems with the DSM, see the 2/17/2010 and 4/21/2011 entries.Psychiatrist: “Our new textbook indicates that your delusions of grandeur were misdiagnosed.  In other words, you’re cured.”Patient:  “Some cure!  I used to be Napoleon.  Now I’m nobody!”Psychiatry is a pseudoscience acting like a religion (i.e., telling people their problem and the solution), but masquerading as a science with big words and lots of money.  Since it is a pseudoscience, we can have a little fun with it by imagining a world in which the Darwin skeptics have the money and the power.  Like them (e.g., 2/27/2010), we can use scientific jargon to diagnose our foes as mentally ill. We could publish our manual in the DSM, Darwinian Symptoms of Madness.Suppose, for instance, we were to diagnose Richard Dawkins with “Design denial disorder” (DDD) with symptoms including (1) obsessive acts of self-persuasion that what one is observing was not designed, but evolved; (2) incessant repetition of Dobzhansky’s proverb that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution; (3) willingness to believe in intelligent design when it comes to aliens seeding life on Earth, but only if the aliens evolved by natural selection; (4) a compulsion to persuade others that there is no God by making money selling books, and (5) an illogical preference to live in a theistic country while promoting atheism.  With the right consensus, we could probably obtain high kappa values to prove our etiology is valid and our diagnosis reliable.  We might even get insurance companies to cover prescription drugs aimed at curing DDD.  Anyone protesting our actions we could diagnose with “DDD co-dependent syndrome” (DDD-CDS), and drug them, too.  Remember, we have the power and the self-serving science to back it up.We would never do such a thing, of course, since we believe in compassionate persuasion and intellectual integrity.  We would never wish to manipulate power by imitating psychiatry’s flawed methods and Darwinian “survival of the fittest” ethics.  We would wish to be transparent and consistent about our belief that “mental illness” is an oxymoron, believing instead that people’s behavioral problems are caused by either sin or physical flaws such as brain damage.  But our imaginary power play is certainly a conceivable thought experiment.  It turns the tables on what some Darwinians actually do: calling their critics insane.The evolutionists’ bible is Darwin’s Origin of Species, with its evolutionary tree of life, and the shrinks’ bible is the DSM-V, with its man-made judgments of what constitutes normal and abnormal behavior.  These ‘bibles’ have their genesis in the flawed assumption that human brains were not designed, but evolved.  The authentic trees of life and of knowledge of good and evil are known by their fruits (02/28/2010).last_img read more

Emirates set for shake-up

first_imgThe world’s biggest international airline, Emirates, is about to embark on the biggest changes in its 31-year history: the introduction of a fourth travel class and low-cost-carrier-style a la carte price to pay for extras that are now free.The airline is scrambling to find new sources of cash as price competition from other airlines hits not only yield – average fares paid – but also total revenue, which has dipped even though the number of passengers the airline is carrying continues to grow strongly.However, Emirates isn’t rushing: it says the announcement of what form its new premium economy service will take could still be up to 18 months away.In fact, it may even decide to launch two different forms of premium economy at once – an economy-plus seat-only deal similar to “economy comfort” offerings popular among US airlines priced at  20-30 per cent above best economy discount fares; and a fully-fledged premium economy similar to that offering by its joint-venture partner, Qantas, which usually sells at double the economy discount rate or more.The new class of seating would offer more “pitch” per seat row – typically 36-38 inches (91-95 centimetres) – with a wider seat (19 inches – 48 cms — across) at eight-abreast per seat row, instead of the squeezy 10-abreast standard economy seat in the airline’s Boeing 777-300ERs, which are just 17 inches (43 cms) wide.At 10-abreast – also used by American Airlines, but not by many other carriers, who’ve stayed with nine-abreast —  Emirates’ 777-300ER have one of the world’s highest seat counts for the type at up to 427.By contrast, airlines that have stuck with nine-abreast have as few as 244 seats (Japan Airlines). Emirates also offers 10-abreast economy in its A380 superjumbos, but the seats are 18 inches (46 cms) wide.Emirates has been forced to make changes to its business model after the latest half-year, reported in November 2016, saw a 75 per cent collapse in profit to $US212 million and a contraction in overall revenue, down one per cent to $US11.3 billion, even though the number of passengers carried by the airline grew nine per cent to 28 million.“The bleak global economic outlook appears to be the new norm, with no immediate resolution in sight,” Emirates’ chairman and chief executive, Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, lamented.But the airline had seen in coming. “I see a change in the way corporate business is going to develop which of course will affect our yields because the high end stuff isn’t going to come through as it was in the good old days,” Emirates president, Sir Tim Clark, told the annual meeting of the International Air Transport Association in June 2016.He said passenger volumes would still grow despite a weak global economy, but air fares were expected to fall 7% this year and would remain depressed.“We are going to be there for a long time on these fare levels,” he said, warning that competition would intensify as new low-cost, long-haul carriers like Norwegian Air Shuttle pushed further into intercontinental routes.That’s great news for travellers, but it means Emirates must now re-evaluate how it generates revenue and profit. Being the only carrier that offered in-flight entertainment in every seat, which Emirates was once alone in doing, is no longer enough.“The trick is to (price) match and deliver more,” Clark told one interviewer. “That is becoming more difficult these days, because in the old days, we were the only kid on the block doing what we’re doing. Now, there are others who are emulating us.“Because certain segments of our markets have become deeply discounted, we’re having to look and see whether we can extract more value through the ancillary revenue stream.“It’s somewhere we’ve never traditionally gone, but the digital world tells us that that’s the way people are thinking. Where the value is clear to them, and is delivered to them in a manner that they expect, they will pay for (extras).”That’s backed by an Ipsos survey of 3000 flyers last year for the US airline lobby, Airlines for America, which found that two-thirds liked the new world of optional extras on top of the basic fare.In fact, Emirates began surcharging for advance seat selection in October 2016 – as little as $US10 on short routes and as much as $US40 on long-haul routes for passengers who want to sit together and not be separated by the booking engines’ random seat allocation.Clark forecast that other optional fees were on the way for items like second checked bags, special food and wine requests, premium check-in or expedited security clearance.Premium economy has also become a money-spinner for airlines like Emirates partner Qantas, which resisted the trend towards the new class for a decade before jumping on board in 2007.According to some airline analysts, for full-service carriers, premium economy is now the most profitable offering per square centimetre of the floorspace it requires, given the cost of the higher service levels afforded to business and first class passengers.Qantas typically charges double its best discount economy fare for premium economy, but on the long intercontinental routes between Australia and the US, a host of carriers including Virgin Australia, Delta, American and United have been successful with less expensive economy-plus offerings providing slightly less legroom than premium economy, but still substantially more than standard economy.Clark has said the long lead time before the change is partly to allow time for a large number of Emirates’ 230 aircraft to be refitted before premium economy is officially offered to travellers.last_img read more

2016 I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest To get a preview of what to expect this harvest season, the Ohio Ag Net and Ohio’s Country Journal team will once again go on the I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour presented by Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers. On the tour, two teams of farmers, agronomists and OCJ/OAN staff will be crisscrossing I-75 and I-71 reporting crop conditions and yield estimates on August 17 and 18. The teams start in the north and meet at the end in Clinton County. Over the two days, each team will sample a representative corn and soybean field in more than 20 counties (for a total of more than 40 counties over the two days).The groups will be estimating yields and overall conditions for corn fields and the conditions and yield potential of soybean fields. We will be updating the results on the go online at ocj.com, so check back regularly on our progress. Coverage will also include photos, videos and radio broadcasts of tour highlights. The results will be posted in the September issue of Ohio’s Country Journal as well. I-75 Team Includes:Sam Custer, OSU ExtensionBen Bowsher, Allen County farmerMike Lutmer, Warren County farmerPaul Ralston, Hardin County farmerMatt Reese, Ohio’s Country Journal I-71 Team Includes:Jim Miller, Fairfield County farmerBill Black, Pickaway County farmerBart Johnson, Ohio’s Country Journal, Delaware County farmerTy Higgins, Ohio Ag NetJevon Rockwell, Erie County farmerlast_img read more

3 Reasons Your Dream Client Won’t Give You an Appointment

first_imgSales people often make these same three mistakes when cold calling and prevent themselves from earning an appointment with their dream client.To learn more, download my ebook, “How to Crush It, Kill It, and Master Cold Calling Now!” at https://thesalesblog.com/resources/ .last_img

Grimaldi Inks USD 400 Mn Deal for Six RoRos

first_imgzoomIllustration; Image Courtesy: Grimaldi The Grimaldi Group from Italy has ordered the construction of six RoRo vessels from the Chinese Jinling shipyard.The sextet, worth USD 400 million, is scheduled for delivery in 2020, and forms part of the company’s ambitious fleet expansion plan.The newbuildings will be 238 meters long, featuring a beam of 34 meters and a gross tonnage of 64,000 tons. They will be able to transport over 7,800 linear meters of rolling units, equivalent to about 500 trailers.In addition, the new ships will pioneer the company’s hybrid design, Grimaldi Green 5th Generation, which means that they will use fossil fuels during navigation and switch to electricity while in port.Once delivered, three ships from the batch will be operated by Grimaldi Lines in the Mediterranean, while the remaining three ice-class newcomers will be purchased by Finnlines, the group’s sister company, for operation in the Baltic Sea.last_img read more