DONEGAL BAY BOAT OWNER PUBLISHES FOOTAGE OF VANDALS WHO REFUSED TO SAY ‘SORRY’

first_imgTHE owners of one of County Donegal’s biggest tourist attractions have published CCTV footage of two vandals – after they failed to say ‘sorry’.The Donegal Bay Waterbus was broken into in the early hours of Monday.Two men could be seen trying to fiddle with the boat’s electrical systems.The company which owns the boat – which takes tourists on trips around the bay – warned those responsible on Tuesday that they had 24 hours to contact them to say ‘sorry’ and it would be forgotten about. However the men never came forward and the matter is now with Gardai in Donegal Town.And by last night more than 50,000 people had viewed the images; though as usual some trolls had their own views.In a post on its facebook page, the Waterbus crew said in a statement: “We wish to thank those who shared our recent pictures and video.“Thanks to you over 53,000 people who saw these images. It is very gratifying to see such a sense of pride and good will in Donegal and beyond.“Due to your efforts we have been made aware of those responsible and the matter is ongoing.“One thing we would like to comment on is that we find it rather strange that some people (you know who you are) find this matter amusing. Having read several ‘humorous’ tweets we can simple say this…Imagine it’s not the boat’s engines that are interfered with next but instead your family car.“Would you find it amusing if all of a sudden the steering failed as your parents, brothers sisters etc drove down the road… think about that. We are sure you wouldn’t be tweeting or messaging in the same light hearted ‘comical’ way.“We would ask those who suggested that this was a publicity stunt to please ‘Unlike’ our page straight away. The Crew here do not appreciate your presence.” DONEGAL BAY BOAT OWNER PUBLISHES FOOTAGE OF VANDALS WHO REFUSED TO SAY ‘SORRY’ was last modified: August 8th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegal bay waterbusDonegal Towntourist attractionvandalslast_img read more

Kaepernick’s reps: We’ve reached out to all NFL teams with ‘little to no response’

first_imgIt’s been three years since Colin Kaepernick put on an NFL jersey, and his agents want us to remember that.Jeff Nailey and Jasmine Windham, who represent Kaepernick, released a document of stated facts about their client, who they say has not been offered an NFL contract since kneeling during the national anthem to protest police violence.“There have been so many false narratives in the media regarding Colin, we believe it is important to set the record straight, again,” the statement …last_img

SA police ‘ready for 2010’

first_img2 July 2008South Africa is well prepared to ensure the safety of the millions of tourists set to visit the country for the 2010 Fifa World Cup, says the South African Police Service.The SA Police Service revealed details of its plans to secure the country’s skies, highways, stadiums, streets and accommodation venues this week, as part of a plan that will see the government spending a further R665-million on procuring state-of-the-art equipment and R640-million on the deployment of more than 41 000 police officers.“I am happy to announce that our comprehensive security plan for the Fifa World Cup was submitted and it is in Zurich and I think Fifa will be satisfied with the security concept in general,” deputy national police commissioner Andre Pruis told reporters in Pretoria on Monday at the release of the country’s 2007/08 crime statistics.“However, we still need to finalise the security plans for the areas and towns where the teams will be staying,” said Pruis, who is in charge of the country’s 2010 World Cup security.He said the police had already begun event-specific training and simulation exercises for the tournament. They had also started procuring items for the event, including water cannons, body armour, mobile police stations, surveillance cameras, helicopters and unmanned surveillance aircraft.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Turning up the media volume

first_imgThis article originally appeared on pagefour of South Africa Now, a six-pagesupplement to the Washington Postproduced on behalf of Brand South Africa.(Click to enlarge.)RELATED ARTICLES• New journalism centre for SU• Keeping the story of HIV alive in SA• Myths, reality and the World Cup• Tutu speaks out for press freedom• Rhodes hosts world journalism meetAnton HarberSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place.After decades of censorship – imposed silence over crucial areas of apartheid– the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening.First there were effectively no media laws at all, then the new Constitution, adopted in 1996, explicitly protected freedom of speech and media, excluding only propaganda for war, incitement to violence and hate speech.The new African National Congress (ANC) government had a positive policy to transform the media and rid it of its apartheid inheritance, encourage diversity and give a media voice to previously excluded communities.Newspapers went through a difficult time of consolidation, with some going out of business, but then there was a boom in tabloids, making this one of the few countries where newspaper sales went up in the early 21st century. Papers like the Daily Sun created a huge new set of newspaper readers, and gave voice to the working class, a voice which had been absent from mainstream media.Investigative journalism flourished, with exposés of every controversial aspect of South African life: bad governance, wasteful spending, white collar crime and social conditions. If the test of an effective watchdog media is that crooks and scoundrels sleep restlessly, then the South African newspapers passed with flying colours. No-one was spared: not even the national chief of police and the president’s personal financial adviser, both of whom were sentenced to prison after being exposed in the media.But media is a contested political area. Democracy not only means freedom of the media, but freedom to criticise, denounce and take issue with the media.Tough news coverage has brought accusations of unfairness, lack of balance and ethics and invasions of personal dignity and privacy. In a society with a long history of racial inequality, issues of dignity are particularly sensitive. These are not unique to South Africa, but they come against the background of a tense transition to democracy, a media often tainted by apartheid history, the fragility of a new social compact and a young government operating under difficult circumstances.This has led to intense debate about whether the media exercises enough responsibility along with its rights: in particular, how to balance freedom of speech against the right to dignity. A new secrecy Bill – intended to bring old apartheid law in line with the new constitution – is hotly contested amid accusations that it seeks to cast the net of secrecy too widely. The Bill is currently being debated in parliament.The ruling ANC has expressed its unhappiness with the newspapers’ system of self-regulation – an ombudsman and a press council – and proposes a statutory appeals tribunal, as recourse for those aggrieved by their treatment at the hands of journalists. They argue that editors have been too reluctant to apologise and correct when they get things wrong.The tribunal suggestion has increased the volume more than ever, with a host of civil society organisations, legal bodies, political parties, academics and institutions speaking out against it.That this proposal can be so hotly debated is itself a sign of a vigorous, open and healthily contested democracy. Clearly, South Africans are not going to give up any freedoms lightly. There is going to be a lot of noise around the right to make noise.Professor Anton Harber is the director of the journalism programme at the University of the Wiwatersrand. He is a former joint founder and editor of the Mail & Guardian newspaper.Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB), or read selected articles online:Powering towards a green economySouth Africa plans to build a massive $21.8-billion, 5 000 MW solar park in its semi-desert Northern Cape province as part of an aggressive push to grow its highly industrialised economy without increasing its carbon footprint.The everyday beauty of SowetoSouth African photographer Jodi Bieber has a special ability to bring out the beauty in the ordinary, even the disfigured. On the cover of Time magazine she made a mutilated Afghani girl look beautiful, and in her latest book Soweto she makes everyday township life shine.Launchpad to a billion consumersBy offering to acquire Massmart for some $4.2-billion, Wal-Mart has joined the parade of global companies looking to South Africa as a springboard into what is increasingly seen as the world’s last great investment frontier.A trek to the start of timeIt will probe the edges of our universe. It will be a virtual time machine, helping scientists explore the origins of galaxies. It’s the Square Kilometre Array, and South Africans are at the heart of its development.Brewing up a global brandMiller Lite. Tastes great. Less filling. And brought to you by world-beating South African company SABMiller.Looking south and east for growthAs the shift in global economic power gains momentum, South Africa’s trade is moving eastwards and southwards in a pattern that both reflects the worldwide trend and helps drive it, writes John Battersby.More than just a celluloid MandelaThere is a special bond between Hollywood actor Morgan Freeman and the man he played in the Clint Eastwood movie Invictus, South African statesman Nelson Mandela.Africa in the new world orderKgalema Motlanthe, South Africa’s deputy president, looks at how African economies’ resilient performance during the global financial crisis points to the continent’s new place in a changing world.Mining history for new solutionsMark Cutifani, CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company, examines why South Africa’s past is key to successfully doing business here in the future.Turning up the media volumeSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place. After decades of apartheid censorship, the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening, writes Anton Harber.A joule of an energy-efficient carSouth Africa, which builds BMWs and Mercedes Benzes for the US market, is in the thick of the race to deliver a truly practical – and stylish – electric car. Meet the Joule.South Africa: Time to believeThe forgiving philosophy of “ubuntu” helps explain how South Africa managed to transcend its turbulent apartheid past and create a unified democracy, writes Simon Barber.Finding sound real estate investmentSouth Africa’s post-apartheid transformation and new middle class are fuelling demand for affordable homes. For private equity fund International Housing Solutions, that means opportunity.My normal, crazy, mixed-up countrySouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Bring on the braaiAll South Africans love it – including Nobel peace prize-winning Desmond Tutu – and its rich, smoky smell floats over the country every Sunday. Celebrate the braai with our great recipe for making boerewors, traditional South African farmer’s sausage.last_img read more

Team SA profile: Marsha Marescia

first_img25 May 2012Marsha Marescia will captain the best prepared South African women’s Olympic squad yet at the London Olympic Games. Now aged 29, she has been a member of the national team since 2001.She made her debut in October of that year at the age of 18. Almost 11 years later, when she participates at the London Olympics, she will bring with her an impressive CV that includes attending two Olympic Games and two World Cups.However, only in recent times, thanks to a sponsorship by Investec, has the South African women’s team been given the kind of backing to enable it to compete with the world’s leading teams. It has resulted in a growing maturity in the side and that has begun to translate into results on the field.Qualified in styleThe South African women’s hockey team qualified for the Olympic Games as African champions, but were required to also win an Olympic qualifying tournament in New Delhi, which they did in style, going through the event unbeaten and defeating hosts, India, 3-1 in the final.Reflecting on the qualification of the team for the Games, Marescia told BuaNews: “The Olympic qualifier was a tough tournament for the Investec ladies’ hockey team. We had an intense preparation period with a number of international games, which paid off in the end as we entered the final being the most prepared team for the event.“It was tough because psychologically each player knows that we would only get one chance to qualify. But once we had done it, we were thrilled.‘We deserve to be in London’“We feel that we deserve to be in London and our results prove it, and now that we have the chance to participate in London, we are looking forward to another tough tournament, but hope to do better than we have done at past Olympic Games.”The opportunities created by Investec’s sponsorship, which have allowed for far more international participation than ever before is invaluable, Marescia said.“The experience definitely helps us to focus on the job at hand. While we spend a lot of time focusing on ourselves, we also spend hours analysing the opposition and their structure, the style and their key players and set pieces.”FIH All StarMarescia, who plays her trade for Rotterdam in the elite Dutch league, is a player that leads from the front, setting an example for her team-mates to follow. That standard is a high one, which is underlined by her selection to the International Hockey Federation’s (FIH) All Star team in 2007, 2009 and 2010.“On the field, I just want to play and make a difference,” she said. “Sometimes making the difference means being the supporter of the others when they are playing well and sometimes it means standing up and making the difference myself.“Playing for South Africa is extremely special,” Marescia added. “It is something that I treasure and I will always work hard to ensure that I never miss out on the opportunity to put on the green and gold and sing our national anthem with pride.”What drives South Africa’s captain? In the Mail and Guardian’s Book of Women, Marescia revealed her personal motto: “Deep within you lies a seed of greatness waiting to be germinated.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

India Today’s letters to the editor of february about phone-tapping controversy

first_imgAmar Singh tackles the phone-tapping controversyTalking TroubleBy making the “phone battle” a national issue, Samajwadi Party (SP) General Secretary Amar Singh has blocked any possibility of leakage of the taped conversation that could have embarrassed him (“The Phone Battle”, January 23). However, politically he has not gained much. The mutual,Amar Singh tackles the phone-tapping controversyTalking TroubleBy making the “phone battle” a national issue, Samajwadi Party (SP) General Secretary Amar Singh has blocked any possibility of leakage of the taped conversation that could have embarrassed him (“The Phone Battle”, January 23). However, politically he has not gained much. The mutual abuse of the SP and the Congress could only help the BJP.A. JACOB SAHAYAM, Thiruvananthapuram”The way Amar Singh has treated the phone-tapping controversy shows that his aim is not to bring up the issue of surveillance but to settle political scores.”B.K. PARMAR, GhaziabadIs it a mere coincidence that immediately after Amar Singh’s brother joined the Congress and claimed to expose the SP leader’s activities, the allegations of phone tapping surfaced? The issue has also pushed aside a more serious matter of the Supreme Court notice to Mulayam Singh Yadav in a case of disproportionate assets. The protests by Amar Singh appear like tactics to garner public sympathy in Uttar Pradesh, where his party’s image has hit rock bottom.P.K. SRIVASTAVA, on e-mailAmar Singh has emerged as the real leader of the Opposition which is starved of issues with which to take on the Centre.NAVNEET DHAWAN, DelhiIt has become fashionable to accuse Sonia Gandhi of anything and everything, no matter what the problem the politicians and bureaucrats face. Since she was born in a foreign country these people with no values find an easy scapegoat in her.GREGORY D’SOUZA, HaridwarPolitical parties always exploit scandals to make it to the headlines. Amar Singh and his party have done the same.K. CHIDANAND KUMAR, BangaloreadvertisementWrong ServeI want to clarify that I was never an employee of K.K. Birla, whereas, you have mentioned that I was a protocol officer (“The Phone Battle”, January 23).AMAR SINGH, National General Secretary, SP, DelhiAmusing TwistsWhere was Brinda Karat when pesticides were found in cold drinks (“Yogi in a Tangle”, January 23)? Such contents were not mentioned on the bottles of these beverages. Even mentioning “artificial colours and flavours” does not specify the exact nature of the contents. A number of medicines, toothpastes and ointments are gelatinebased. Is it not the duty of the manufacturers to mention that gelatine is derived from bones? Why should it be mandatory for only ayurvedic medicines to mention all the contents?RAJIV CHOPRA, DehradunIt is not correct to say that “the law does not require declaration of ingredients of a particular medicine if it is based on classical texts” recognised under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act. The Second Schedule of the Act requires “all medicines other than homeopathic” to have a list of all ingredients on the label or container. Medicines that contravene this requirement are deemed to be “misbranded drugs” and invite legal action. The only concession available to the ayurvedic, siddha and unani products is that if the ingredients are listed in the classical texts, then manufacturers need not obtain marketing approval from the Drugs Controller General.CHANDRA M. GULHATI, DelhiThe article is highly biased against the yogi. While yoga guru B.K.S. Iyengar may have excellent knowledge of certain aspects of yoga, he seems to have none as far as pranayama is concerned.Y.N.I. ANAND, MysoreIyenger is a revered yoga guru for the Indian media because he has taught yoga abroad. Ramdev’s simple yoga steps are imparting health benefits to millions of Indians but this is not the criterion by which the Indian media in the English language judges anybody. Yoga and ayurveda are India’s ancient treasures and if someone is making the common man aware of their benefits, then his efforts should be appreciated. Politicians like Karat are free to raise the labour issue if there is a violation of the law but mixing it with the issue of vegetarianism only makes them a butt of joke.ARUN BALA, on e-mailRamdev has done injustice to not only vegetarians but also non-vegetarians. For who would like to eat the skull and bone powder of human beings? He should be punished.SNEHAL SHUKLA, AhmedabadKarat has displayed great courage by exposing Ramdev’s questionable acts. His claims of achieving cures for cancer, advanced arthritis and diabetes through yoga and ayurvedic medicines have not been scientifically evaluated.RAJU VAISHYA, DelhiThe controversy over ayurvedic medicines underscores the need for stringent regulation. Surveys reveal that adulteration of alternative medicines is rampant across India. Such practices bring the Indian businesses and philosophically rich medical systems into disrepute. A better regulatory framework will reward genuine practitioners and expose charlatans.ANIL KUMAR PANDIT, DelhiadvertisementThe Jehad FactoryRecruitment of the Hindus by the Hizb-ul Mujahideen in Kashmir on allurement of money exposes the falsity of the terrorists’ commitment to a cause (“Now Hindu Jehadis”, January 23). The picture is the same elsewhere too. The Maoists in Jehanabad and Giridih reportedly distributed pamphlets in Jharkhand and Bihar, inviting young people to join the “revolution” on a monthly stipend of Rs 2,000 and compensation of Rs 2 lakh in case of death.ASOKE C. BANERJEE, KolkataThe profession of terrorism has nothing to do with religion. It is exploitation of the youth. Governments in all states as well as at the Centre must provide counselling and employment to the boys who have taken up arms to bring them back into the mainstream.RAKESH BAHUGUNA, on e-mailFoot in MouthPutting his foot in his mouth is not new for Raj Singh Dungarpur, the manager of the Indian team (“Unsound Bite”, January 23). Raking up the issue of Sourav Ganguly’s performance at this stage does not serve any purpose. It will only demoralise the team. Dungarpur should be removed from the post. Discipline is not something to be enforced only among the players. It is applicable to our loud-mouthed sports officials also.V.V.S. MANI, MumbaiTest of MettleWest Bengal rather than Bihar will be the real challenge for Election Commission (EC) official K.J. Rao because in Bihar the people were with him (“For a Level Playing Field”, January 23). But West Bengal may not allow Rao to function smoothly with both the state Government and party cadres determined to resist any change.SUBHASH C. AGRAWAL, DelhiThe article says that I had requested the EC to remove state government employees from the election coordination committees. I had petitioned the commission to exclude only the employees belonging to the Coordination Committee of State Government Employees’ Unions and the “Non-Gazetted Police Karmachari Samiti” or to any of their affiliates.TATHAGATA ROY, President, BJP, West BengalOverseas Citizenship of India cards to NRIsFAMILY FOLDSGiving Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI) cards to the NRIs is a way of reaching out to them (“Promises, Promises,” January 23). It will help them develop a stake in India.REKHA RAI, PatnaIt is a tragedy that the Government has decided to shower sops like voting rights and OCI cards on the NRIs. Investments in India by them have always been driven by interest rather than loyalty.THARCIUS S. FERNANDO, ChennaiIndia is finally treating the NRIs right by welcoming them. This will create a goodwill trust for it abroad.VIVEK RASTOGI, Shimlalast_img read more

10 months agoArsenal kid Bukayo Saka thrilled to make Premier League debut

first_imgArsenal kid Bukayo Saka thrilled to make Premier League debutby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBukayo Saka was thrilled to make his Premier League debut in Arsenal’s 4-1 win over Fulham.Saka replaced Alex Iwobi with three minutes remaining in our 4-1 win over Fulham, adding to his two appearances in the Europa League late last year.“Right now I’m feeling so happy,” he said. “I feel blessed to have made my debut and get minutes on the pitch. I just want to thank my family, my friends and everyone at the club who’s helped me to get to this stage.“It’s been a tough stage, a long stage, but through hard work and determination I managed to get here.“I’m not stopping now. I’m very hungry. I just want to work hard with every chance I get. In training I just want to impress the coach so I can get back on the pitch.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoMan City, Chelsea in contact for Brescia whiz Sandro Tonali

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City, Chelsea in contact for Brescia whiz Sandro Tonaliby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrescia could double the price of Sandro Tonali by the end of the season.Il Mattino says Brescia president Massimo Cellino slapped a €30m price-tag on the teen over the summer.However, after a full season in Serie A, Cellino is expected to seek double that valuation next summer.Juventus, Napoli, Inter Milan, Roma, Manchester City, Chelsea and Monaco are all in contact with Cellino.It’s been suggested Napoli boss Carlo Ancelotti is keen on Tonali, likening him to Andrea Pirlo, whose career he launched at AC Milan. last_img

Michigan Lifts 10Year Ban Against Chris Webber and Two

The University of Michigan and Chris Webber can officially reconnect after a 10-year ban was lifted by the NCAA on Wednesday. The ban was also lifted for Maurice Taylor and Louis Bullock.The NCAA forced Michigan to cut all ties from the three former Wolverines and the late Robert Traylor for a decade following a federal investigation. The investigation revealed that that deceased booster Ed Martin gave them more that $600,000 when they were student athletes.But now the option to renew the relationship with school is up to Webber, Taylor and Bullock. However, the Michigan has to be willing to want to reconnect as well.“I’ve never met any of those guys, and I am looking forward to meeting them,” Michigan athletic director Dave Brandon told The Associated Press in an interview Tuesday night. “If any of those guys are interested in meeting with me, that would be great.”Fellow Fab Five member Jalen Rose told the Detroit News that he has seen a line drawn that if Webber does not apologize then they will punish the rest of the members of the Fab Five. But Rose said it is not on Weber to issue an apology to Michigan in order to receive recognition for success that the group achieve, the university can do that despite what Webber decides to do.“This morning, I felt really good about the dissociation being over and having the opportunity to reunite with the University of Michigan,” Taylor told The AP on Wednesday. “I’m excited to talk to Mr. Brandon and coach (John) Beilein. While I had some success in the NBA, there was a void in my life because of the circumstances.”Martin, who died in February 2003, plead guilty to conspiracy to laundering money, saying that he used gambling money and combined other funds in loans to Webber, other players and their families.“Ed was made out to be something he wasn’t, he wasn’t a booster who steered you to a school or guy who preyed on kids,” Taylor said. “He was just a great guy in Detroit, who helped out anybody playing ball of any kind in the city.”With the ban lifted, Webber can possibly reunite with his fellow Fab Five members to see their 1992 and 1993 Final Four banners go back up in the rafters, if Michigan chooses to do so.Rose, Webber, Juwan Howard, Jimmy King and Ray Jackson attended the NCAA final in Atlanta last month. However, Webber chose to sit in a suite to watch the game.“You can’t think of Michigan without thinking of us,” Webber said in a 2007 interview with the AP. read more

US Beats Australia But Germany Inches Ahead In Our Womens World Cup

Check out FiveThirtyEight’s Women’s World Cup predictions.In its opening campaign Monday, the U.S. women’s national team (USWNT) did not exactly look like a team that — heading into this tournament — had the best chance of winning this year’s World Cup title. It had a 68 percent chance of defeating Australia going into Monday, but when the whistle blew to signal the start of the game, the USWNT looked jittery. The team resorted to long balls and the all-too-familiar direct style of American play, completing only 73 percent of its passes in the first half (compared with a 77 percent pass-completion rate in the friendlies leading up to the World Cup).Despite the shaky start, the Americans were up 1-0 after only 12 minutes, thanks to a nasty deflection of Megan Rapinoe’s shot off an Australian defender. The Matildas equalized in the 28th minute from a left-footed shot by captain Lisa De Vanna, and by the 60th minute, the game was still tied 1-1 — right around the time that we said U.S. fans should start sweating as a draw starts to become the most likely outcome.But just one minute short of our 62nd-minute sweat-marker, Christen Press scored her first World Cup goal, and the U.S. finally began to settle down, completing 80 percent of their passes in the second half. The Americans went on to win 3-1, increasing their chances of advancing from Group D to 99 percent (up from 95 percent before Monday’s game).Germany, the other front-runner, however, opened its World Cup run with a resounding 10-0 win over the Ivory Coast (a team that had a Women’s Soccer Power Index rating of 75.5 — compared to Australia’s 88.8). But as probabilistic forecasts go, a victory that big increased Germany’s chances of winning the tournament. It is now at 31 percent, ahead of the Americans’ 28 percent.As of this morning, Germany is now the most likely team to win the World Cup. But we’d caution against reading into this too much; we’ve yet to see how Germany fares against an opponent like Australia. That won’t happen until Thursday, when Germany faces Norway (whose WSPI rating, 88.9, is almost identical to Australia’s). Although the matchup seems similar to U.S.-Australia, the Germans are heavily favored to win — 72 percent to Norway’s 11 percent.The U.S. and Germany aren’t likely to face each other until the semifinals, but we expect that they’ll continue to battle for the top spot in our Women’s World Cup predictions throughout this tournament. We knew these two teams would be the front-runners, but we’ll see if they continue to further distance themselves from the pack — Japan, which beat Switzerland in a meager 1-0 win on Monday night, now has a 9 percent chance of winning the tournament after starting the World Cup at 10 percent. France and Brazil stand at 7 percent and 6 percent, respectively, but these odds could change after their opening games today. read more