Give locals a chance, says Dr Paul Wright

first_imgLast week our under 17 Reggae Girlz left Jamaica to compete in the women’s CONCACAF Championships in the Caribbean island of Grenada. Our young teenage footballers had been crowned the Caribbean Football Union champions last year and after a preparation which included a training camp in Florida that head coach Lorne Donaldson described as “useful”, expectations were high.The pre-qualification hype suggested that other than the mighty USA, Jamaica should easily qualify for the next stage, which is the ultimate prize, the Under 17 World Cup. Jamaican football fans, anxious for another appearance of the national team in a World Cup Finals might be forgiven for thinking that this team of young girls comprised young Jamaican footballers who played football in this country under trying conditions, with the hope of representing their country in competition.No such luck. The team selected to play in the first game against the mighty USA comprised of seven American and four Canadian players, who have legitimately qualified to represent Jamaica in this tournament.No local-based player was good enough to make the cut.The quaint and old fashioned idea of international competition being the best of ours against the best of yours has once again been abandoned in the desperate attempt to win. Apparently, development will come later.Unfortunately, our girls lost to the USA 8-1.Our next game against Costa Rica saw our young girls leading 2-1 before eventually effectively bowing out of the tournament by losing 3-2. Today we play defending champions Mexico. Hopefully some of our local footballers will get a game as there is no chance of our qualifying and there is very little difference in losing 1-0 or 6-0.What would be different would be the fact that local footballers gained valuable experience in playing in a World Cup qualifying tournament against superior opponents. The lessons learnt in that match cannot be duplicated in a practise or ‘friendly’ game.Jamaica’s football is in crisis. That fact seems lost on the hierarchy of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), who constantly look overseas for talent when contemplating selection for international competition. Once you have an accent you are in.What kind of system is that? How can our local players improve? Why are our local coaches, those who constantly win local competitions, always overlooked for someone who trains abroad. Why is it not possible for the coach of the Barbican women’s football team who have yet to lose a match in two years been asked to coach a Jamaica team? Why is it not possible for the coach of Jamalco and other local netball teams asked to coach a Jamaica team? Why is it that the coach of the Jamaica cricket team, who has coached the team from first to last in the past two (or is it three) years not relieved of his duties?These are questions that need answers. These answers will only come when we-the-people demand it.I’m of the opinion that those in charge of our local sporting organisations have some other agenda than developing local talent. God bless our track and field athletes who have shown that there is absolutely nothing wrong with Jamaica. In fact, foreigners leave their first world countries to train here in Jamaica, while we the leaders of our other sporting organisations constantly look abroad for talent.Things can change. Recent happenings give me hope. Swimming has seamlessly changed leaders. The other sporting organisations have leaders who are prepared to defy the courts, Prime Ministers and fans, while desperately clinging on to power. Let there be power to the people.last_img read more

Emirates set for shake-up

first_imgThe world’s biggest international airline, Emirates, is about to embark on the biggest changes in its 31-year history: the introduction of a fourth travel class and low-cost-carrier-style a la carte price to pay for extras that are now free.The airline is scrambling to find new sources of cash as price competition from other airlines hits not only yield – average fares paid – but also total revenue, which has dipped even though the number of passengers the airline is carrying continues to grow strongly.However, Emirates isn’t rushing: it says the announcement of what form its new premium economy service will take could still be up to 18 months away.In fact, it may even decide to launch two different forms of premium economy at once – an economy-plus seat-only deal similar to “economy comfort” offerings popular among US airlines priced at  20-30 per cent above best economy discount fares; and a fully-fledged premium economy similar to that offering by its joint-venture partner, Qantas, which usually sells at double the economy discount rate or more.The new class of seating would offer more “pitch” per seat row – typically 36-38 inches (91-95 centimetres) – with a wider seat (19 inches – 48 cms — across) at eight-abreast per seat row, instead of the squeezy 10-abreast standard economy seat in the airline’s Boeing 777-300ERs, which are just 17 inches (43 cms) wide.At 10-abreast – also used by American Airlines, but not by many other carriers, who’ve stayed with nine-abreast —  Emirates’ 777-300ER have one of the world’s highest seat counts for the type at up to 427.By contrast, airlines that have stuck with nine-abreast have as few as 244 seats (Japan Airlines). Emirates also offers 10-abreast economy in its A380 superjumbos, but the seats are 18 inches (46 cms) wide.Emirates has been forced to make changes to its business model after the latest half-year, reported in November 2016, saw a 75 per cent collapse in profit to $US212 million and a contraction in overall revenue, down one per cent to $US11.3 billion, even though the number of passengers carried by the airline grew nine per cent to 28 million.“The bleak global economic outlook appears to be the new norm, with no immediate resolution in sight,” Emirates’ chairman and chief executive, Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, lamented.But the airline had seen in coming. “I see a change in the way corporate business is going to develop which of course will affect our yields because the high end stuff isn’t going to come through as it was in the good old days,” Emirates president, Sir Tim Clark, told the annual meeting of the International Air Transport Association in June 2016.He said passenger volumes would still grow despite a weak global economy, but air fares were expected to fall 7% this year and would remain depressed.“We are going to be there for a long time on these fare levels,” he said, warning that competition would intensify as new low-cost, long-haul carriers like Norwegian Air Shuttle pushed further into intercontinental routes.That’s great news for travellers, but it means Emirates must now re-evaluate how it generates revenue and profit. Being the only carrier that offered in-flight entertainment in every seat, which Emirates was once alone in doing, is no longer enough.“The trick is to (price) match and deliver more,” Clark told one interviewer. “That is becoming more difficult these days, because in the old days, we were the only kid on the block doing what we’re doing. Now, there are others who are emulating us.“Because certain segments of our markets have become deeply discounted, we’re having to look and see whether we can extract more value through the ancillary revenue stream.“It’s somewhere we’ve never traditionally gone, but the digital world tells us that that’s the way people are thinking. Where the value is clear to them, and is delivered to them in a manner that they expect, they will pay for (extras).”That’s backed by an Ipsos survey of 3000 flyers last year for the US airline lobby, Airlines for America, which found that two-thirds liked the new world of optional extras on top of the basic fare.In fact, Emirates began surcharging for advance seat selection in October 2016 – as little as $US10 on short routes and as much as $US40 on long-haul routes for passengers who want to sit together and not be separated by the booking engines’ random seat allocation.Clark forecast that other optional fees were on the way for items like second checked bags, special food and wine requests, premium check-in or expedited security clearance.Premium economy has also become a money-spinner for airlines like Emirates partner Qantas, which resisted the trend towards the new class for a decade before jumping on board in 2007.According to some airline analysts, for full-service carriers, premium economy is now the most profitable offering per square centimetre of the floorspace it requires, given the cost of the higher service levels afforded to business and first class passengers.Qantas typically charges double its best discount economy fare for premium economy, but on the long intercontinental routes between Australia and the US, a host of carriers including Virgin Australia, Delta, American and United have been successful with less expensive economy-plus offerings providing slightly less legroom than premium economy, but still substantially more than standard economy.Clark has said the long lead time before the change is partly to allow time for a large number of Emirates’ 230 aircraft to be refitted before premium economy is officially offered to travellers.last_img read more

How To Sell Green Upgrades: Better Insulation

first_imgR-30 is good and R-38 is “gooder.” That’s kind of how we sell insulation, right?At the end of the day, when we talk about green upgrades, this is probably the one item that most consumers understand better than any other. The maxim “more is better” is, with few exceptions, pretty safe territory when it comes to insulation. Oh, if it were on that simple!I like to tell consumers today that it is the proper installation of insulation, more than anything, which will ensure they get the realized R-value they have purchased. After all, if you compare the R-values per inch for fiberglass, cotton, open-cell spray foam, and cellulose, you just don’t see a huge difference. The value of a third-party inspectionOne of the key tenets of selling insulation upgrades, then, is to first focus your presentation on your installation processes — processes which will ensure a high-quality job regardless of insulation type. And that must include third-party inspection of the installation.If you are already building LEED, Energy Star, or NGBS projects, this will not be a problem, as the insulation inspection will be required. But if you are new to green and want to start taking smaller steps to becoming a better builder/remodeler, this is a very good inexpensive first step to take.Any rater/verifier/inspector with nationally recognized credentials could perform this inspection and give you a report when finished. And you can find those inspectors at your local homebuilders’ association. A minimum trip charge is all that is required, and assuming you pass and a follow-up inspection is not required, it will only cost you about $300. HOW TO SELL GREEN UPGRADESPart One: Radiant Barrier PaintsPart Two: Tankless Water HeatersPart Three: Energy AuditsPart Four: Exhaust FansPart Five: Electrical ImprovementsPart Seven: A Few Small Things Using insulation to reduce air leakageNow that you have successfully demonstrated to your client that they will get the R-value advertised on the insulation package by virtue of your proper installation processes, you can talk about the unseen benefits of different non-traditional insulation upgrades. That means talking about reducing the air leakage rate, which can be achieved by installing spray foam (or in some cases blown-in-place insulation). Because if you have air leaking through your parka on a cold winter day, your body is intently focused on where that air is coming in, and you could care less about the places where you are warm. Your attention is devoted to stopping that air leakage, right? Well, your house operates the same way. If cold air is leaking around, over, under or through the insulation, the insulation value of the complete home is compromised severely. Unless, of course you install an insulation that will eliminate air leakage in the first place.Hence the exploding market in spray foams, blown insulation, and countless hybirds. Do they insulate as well as typical batts? Sure they do — in some cases even better. But not so much better they are worth the price difference. But the price difference that is worth paying for is their air-sealing capabilities.You get to buy a parka that has no air leaks. That’s what blown-in insulation and spray foams do so well: they get into the nooks and crannies, holes and crevices, and plug them up or cover them to stop that dastardly air from leaking into or out of the house! The homeowner benefits, and so do youSo the next time you meet with your client, talk insulation. Talk first about proper installation, and then talk about the superior air leakage elimination benefits of upgraded insulation.That is what will make insulation upgrades such an easy sell — it has tangible benefits to the homeowner, and then, of course, to your bottom line! One tip on the inspection: make sure your project manager and insulation contractor are on site so that they could learn what the inspector is looking for.last_img read more

10 months agoArsenal kid Bukayo Saka thrilled to make Premier League debut

first_imgArsenal kid Bukayo Saka thrilled to make Premier League debutby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBukayo Saka was thrilled to make his Premier League debut in Arsenal’s 4-1 win over Fulham.Saka replaced Alex Iwobi with three minutes remaining in our 4-1 win over Fulham, adding to his two appearances in the Europa League late last year.“Right now I’m feeling so happy,” he said. “I feel blessed to have made my debut and get minutes on the pitch. I just want to thank my family, my friends and everyone at the club who’s helped me to get to this stage.“It’s been a tough stage, a long stage, but through hard work and determination I managed to get here.“I’m not stopping now. I’m very hungry. I just want to work hard with every chance I get. In training I just want to impress the coach so I can get back on the pitch.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoMan City, Chelsea in contact for Brescia whiz Sandro Tonali

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City, Chelsea in contact for Brescia whiz Sandro Tonaliby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrescia could double the price of Sandro Tonali by the end of the season.Il Mattino says Brescia president Massimo Cellino slapped a €30m price-tag on the teen over the summer.However, after a full season in Serie A, Cellino is expected to seek double that valuation next summer.Juventus, Napoli, Inter Milan, Roma, Manchester City, Chelsea and Monaco are all in contact with Cellino.It’s been suggested Napoli boss Carlo Ancelotti is keen on Tonali, likening him to Andrea Pirlo, whose career he launched at AC Milan. last_img

Big Papi Needs More Time To Think

At the beginning of this season, Major League Baseball instituted a new set of rules to make the games go faster. The idea was to limit how often batters can step out of the box during at-bats, thereby shortening the delay between pitches. The Red Sox’s David Ortiz was not happy about these rules and suggested that the changes could harm his performance. As indicated by his temporary benching two months into the 2015 season, Ortiz may have been right.Thus far, the much-discussed batter’s box rule changes have had at most only a minor effect on the overall time of games. For individual batters, however, the impact of the rule has been anywhere from negligible to remarkable. Some hitters already had quick routines and didn’t need to make any alterations. Others liked to step off the plate after every pitch, a habit that the new rules outlaw.The older veterans have been the most affected by the rule change. I’ve shown before that older batters are the players most likely to dawdle, the 39-year-old Ortiz included. From last year to this year, Ortiz has decreased his time between pitches by almost two full seconds, according to Fangraphs.1The Baseball Prospectus numbers are different from Fangraphs’, perhaps because they exclude foul balls and delays longer than 60 seconds. However, both sets agree that Ortiz has sped up. Given Ortiz’s rather vocal opposition to the idea of cutting any time from his routine, it seems reasonable to believe that this was a change the new rules forced upon Big Papi.Whatever his struggles with the clock, Ortiz has endured a disappointing season so far at the plate. Big Papi is currently earning a .289 weighted On-Base Average (wOBA), 20 percent worse than an average hitter in this overall measure of offensive production. This mark is far off his projected performance (.365 wOBA, according to the Steamer projection system) and the worst he’s put up since 1999, when he played in only 10 games.Ortiz isn’t the only veteran slugger suddenly looking helpless with the bat. Tigers designated hitter Victor Martinez has gone from tearing the cover off the ball (a .411 wOBA last year) to rarely getting it out of the infield this year (.246 wOBA). Aramis Ramirez has fallen apart in a similar fashion, dropping from .334 to .274. Some of these hitters’ underperformance can be blamed on injuries, small sample size and bad luck, but some of it likely comes down to decreased skill. Hitters over 35 who have racked up at least 100 plate appearances (PAs) have been an underwhelming lot this year, collectively falling .016 shy of their projections by wOBA (on average). To put that in perspective, that’s roughly the difference between the offensive performances of Mike Trout and Brandon Belt this year.Older hitters are always risky and come with the chance of sudden collapse, but last year hitters over 35 with at least 3002This is the same 100-PA cutoff as above, but roughly prorated out to the length of a full season. PAs hit only 3 points worse than their projected outcomes.It’s tougher to figure out whether it’s the rule changes that are causing older hitters to do poorly, though. For all hitters, no correlation is obvious between being forced to speed up and doing worse than expected.3The correlation coefficient is a measly -.025, nowhere close to statistically significant. The lack of a relationship implies that pace may not be the driving factor.When you look at it with regard to specific hitters, however, pace begins to seem much more important.4Here I am using data supplied to me by Pitch Info. Every pitch that’s thrown in the majors has a run value attached to it. If a 1-1 pitch is a strike, it increases the probability of a strikeout happening, and an average 1-2 count is going to lead to .0748 fewer runs than the 1-1 count. If we take those expected run values of each pitch, we can see whether a long delay before the pitch changes the number of runs that come from it.For all hitters in 2014, pitches that were preceded by more than a 30-second delay were worth about .0028 runs per pitch.5This data set does not include the first pitch of each at-bat. Pitches that followed less than a 30-second delay were worse (at -.0052 runs per pitch), but only by a small margin. So there was a very slight advantage to the batter to stepping out of the box or otherwise postponing the pitch.Ortiz, on the other hand, gains an inordinate amount of value from delaying the pitch.For Ortiz in 2014, pitches thrown after 30 seconds gained .0289 runs, whereas pitches under 30 seconds were worth only .0014 runs. The difference a few seconds makes to Ortiz is about three times the value for the average batter. This isn’t a fluke just for 2014: Four of the past five years have seen Ortiz reap great benefits from delaying the time between pitches by 30 seconds or more.Ramirez’s numbers tell a similar story. Since 2011, Ramirez has been building his value from delays that last more than 30 seconds. In 2014, Ramirez added .0556 runs per pitch when time between pitches was long, but he lost .0013 runs per pitch when it was short.We can also contrast Ortiz and Ramirez with younger sluggers. The Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton, for example, is every bit as powerful and patient as Ortiz (if not more so). But Stanton delivers his hits about equally whether the time between pitches is long or short (.0183 for long and .0224 for short). If anything, Stanton does slightly better when there’s less time.We can’t say for sure that the delay between pitches causes Ortiz or Ramirez to do better. But consider that these players are on the older side and are potentially losing the physical skills that made them threats in their younger years. In the absence of the muscles needed to adjust to pitches in the air, these more seasoned sluggers might make up for it with experience. By taking their time to anticipate what pitch is coming next, Ortiz and others like him may be able to guess where a pitch will go before it leaves the pitcher’s hand. In this way, experience can compensate for deteriorating bat speed.That process of educated guessing takes time, Ortiz says. If Big Papi feels hurried or distracted by the umpire (even if he isn’t actually taking any less time between pitches), it could contribute to a reduced ability to predict the next pitch. In turn, that could change hard-hit fly balls to weakly struck grounders, as Ortiz estimates the wrong location of an oncoming pitch.It’s hard to ever count Ortiz out. Many commentators incorrectly predicted his demise in 2009, but Ortiz came roaring back to post a couple of his best seasons in the last five years. Still, Ortiz is facing a new and difficult task: adjusting to his declining physical skills, potentially without having the time to use his most valuable mental skill (experience). Thanks to the new emphasis on pace of play, it’s a dilemma common to many of the elder statesmen of baseball. read more

Commentary Tressel stands tall against NCAA critics attacking his credibility

Inside and outside of Columbus, there is a crusade-like movement to put an end to the Jim Tressel era at Ohio State. Like King Leonidas in the movie “300,” I’ll lead the charge of the outmanned against the mass of millions who want to take out the OSU football coach. This much is clear already: Tressel is not going to step down neither because of withholding information from the NCAA nor because of any punishment levied against him. If anything, he’s now entrenching himself even deeper as an OSU football coach by refusing to step down while simultaneously increasing the pressure on the administration to fire him. Fortunately for him, athletic director Gene Smith and university President E. Gordon Gee gave him their full support during their press conference March 8. Imagine banning OSU from the inaugural Big Ten Championship Game and a bowl game. Can the NCAA bring itself to do it? So far, the only hit the program as a whole has taken is its reputation in the media. And the media onslaught isn’t forgiving toward Tressel. Sports Illustrated’s Stewart Mandel wrote Monday: “Tressel’s tenure at Ohio State is numbered. It may even be over before the end of the calendar year.” This isn’t really a fresh take. It should have been evident since the original story came out that Tressel intentionally misled investigators in an effort to protect his players and their eligibility. If you didn’t believe he should have been fired a month ago, there’s no reason why Monday’s findings should change your mind. Nor should it increase the likelihood that he gets fired. He did violate his contract, and that is a fireable offense by the terms of his agreement with the university. It’s hard to say that’s honorable. Yet, in defiantly standing against the NCAA, he is honorable. Tressel had the option of sending a dagger into the dreams of a potential national championship season last year. Instead, he’s now daring the NCAA to slam the Buckeye football program. Is he putting the program in jeopardy? Not at all, considering the NCAA’s tendencies. If it proves to be as gutless as it usually is in handing out punishments, then the only one who should — and probably will — get hit hard is Tressel himself. Some media members are speculating that a bowl ban is a potential penalty. That would equate this situation to USC, which received a two-year bowl ban after former running back Reggie Bush received improper benefits. If OSU compliance has been as up-front about the situation as it leads on, there is no lack of institutional control here, unlike at USC. OSU athletics is a sacred cow and a huge moneymaker for the NCAA. With the slew of victories and Big Ten titles under Tressel’s watch, that hit isn’t even enough to make a dent to the people who matter most: potential recruits and current players. To them, Tressel’s legacy and the program’s reputation are as sterling as ever. I know Leonidas and his soldiers meet death in the end, but Tressel will survive this NCAA onslaught. read more

Three OSU players still suspended for game against Toledo

Contrary to what Ohio State said earlier this week, junior running back Jordan Hall, sophomore defensive back Corey Brown and junior defensive back Travis Howard will not be available for the game against Toledo on Saturday. OSU issued a statement late Friday afternoon that said Hall, Howard and Brown have not yet been reinstated by the NCAA, and therefore, will not participate in Saturday’s game against Toledo. “The university continues to work with the NCAA on the reinstatement process and is hopeful that the student-athletes will be reinstated soon,” the statement said. The statement also said that the university would have no further comment on the matter. The NCAA released a statement just minutes after OSU released its statement, clarifying some things concerning the players’ eligibility. “The nature and scope of their violations merit a minimum two-game suspension,” the NCAA’s statement read. “The facts submitted by the university have raised further questions that need to be answered before the reinstatement process is complete.” Thursday, it was reported that the players received $200 in cash during a fundraiser. This is consistent with the university’s statement last week, that the three players received impermissible benefits totaling less that $300 each. The Buckeyes will now continue to rely on the running back tandem of sophomore Carlos Hyde and freshman Rod Smith, the two backs featured in last Saturday’s game against Akron. There is a chance that sophomore running back Jaamal Berry will be available this week as well, but Berry has been nursing a hamstring injury and his status is uncertain. read more

Urban Meyer Ohio State football kick off season with 5610 win against

The offense sputtered in the first quarter while Miami jumped to an early, 3-0, lead, but the Buckeyes, led by sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller and his receiving corps, scored touchdowns on three consecutive possessions to go up, 21-3, before the half. OSU didn’t look back. Miller set an OSU single-game rushing record for quarterbacks in the win with 161 yards and one touchdown, breaking Cornelius Greene’s 1974 record. Miller also tied Greene for the most 100-yard rushing games in OSU history with four. “The objective with Braxton is to make him from an athlete playing quarterback to a quarterback that manages,” Meyer said. “He has to be a leader and he showed that today.  By game’s end, OSU junior Carlos Hyde collected 84 yards and two touchdowns on 17 carries and receivers Corey Brown, a senior, and Devin Smith, a sophomore, each collected a touchdown reception before a chorus of Buckeyes added scores of their own. There were frequent off-field reminders that Saturday was Meyer’s first game at OSU, from the game day program, which featured Meyer’s likeness, to a banner unfurled by the Block-O student cheering section. Meyer, squinting from the sideline, focused his attention not on the celebration that was his first game as OSU coach, but the Silver Bullets defense, which was on-field for the first official snap of his Buckeyes coaching tenure. OSU eventually forced a Miami punt on its first series. Then, at the 13:34 mark of the first quarter, Meyer’s spread offense made its Ohio Stadium debut. Miller took the first snap and rushed for three yards. The possession, which began deep in OSU territory, eventually stalled, ending in a punt. Twice in the first quarter, Meyer’s defense had its collective back pressed against its own end zone. In the first instance, Miami freshman kicker Kaleb Patterson missed a 24-yard field goal attempt about seven minutes into the game. OSU was unable to dodge a second bullet, however, and Patterson redeemed himself on Miami’s next possession with a 23-yard field goal that put his side up, 3-0, with 5:06 to play in the first quarter. The Buckeyes, perhaps fortunate not to be trailing by two touchdowns, staggered into the second quarter trailing 3-0. Meyer said the first 15 minutes were embarrassing.  “Obviously, the first quarter was very poor football,” Meyer said.  Not only was OSU’s offense sputtering early, but Miami’s offense was stealing the show. The RedHawks outgained OSU in the first quarter, 178-42, and the partnership of Miami senior quarterback Zac Dysert and junior receiver Nick Harwell gashed the Buckeyes’ defense several times. Dysert finished the game, 31-of-53 passing for 303 yards and two interceptions while Harwell ended the game with 8 receptions for 120 yards and a touchdown. The second quarter yielded different results from the very beginning. The first big blow for OSU came when Miller lobbed a 38-yard pass to Brown, allowing OSU to cross into RedHawks territory and down to the 23-yard line for the first time in the game. On the next play, Smith hauled in a one-handed circus catch in the back right corner of the south end zone to bring OSU fans to their feet – it was the first score and lead of the Meyer era. “It was definitely my best all time catch,” Smith said. “I’ve had some catches at practice but nothing like this one.” The touchdown catch by Smith, who dropped down on his side after corralling Miller’s pass with only his right hand, capped an 83-yard drive that put OSU up, 7-3. The Buckeyes came right back down the field on their next drive and tacked on another touchdown when Miller found Brown on a five-yard touchdown catch to cap a 57-yard drive. OSU’s offensive stagger was gone – now it was swaggering, marching to two touchdowns on consecutive drives that lasted a combined 3:25. Suddenly, the Buckeyes were outgaining Miami, 188-172. Then came another score. A 33-yard rush by Miller pushed the Buckeyes down to Miami’s 2-yard line and Hyde finished the drive two plays later with a 2-yard dive into the end zone. The cheers softened, fans began to walk about the aisles and stadium corridors – it was a comfortable lead that OSU would only add to. Then came Hyde’s desperate, goal line lunge as time expired in the first half. OSU lost out on a chance at more points in that instance, but Miller made up for it early in the second half. OSU was back on the offensive a mere 17 seconds into the third quarter. Miller dashed down the visiting sideline and stuttered at the tail end of a 66-yard run to shake the lone remaining Miami defender before crossing into the end zone. Make it 28-3, OSU, and counting. Meyer’s special teams unit, which contains a subunit referred to by coaches and players as “the freak show,” got in on the scoring action too. OSU forced a RedHawks punt on the visitors’ next possession, but a play that was officially scored as a “team rush” resulted in a snap that never reached Miami’s punter. The ball was loose and sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby came up with it in Miami’s end zone for another touchdown to make it 35- 3. At 10:24 in the third quarter, Miami struck back when Dysert connected with Harwell on a 44-yard touchdown pass to narrow its deficit to 35-10. The pace of the scoring slowed for both teams after that touchdown, and the 35-10 score line held into early in the fourth quarter. OSU senior cornerback Travis Howard intercepted Dysert for the second time at the 14:09 mark of the fourth quarter, setting the offense up at Miami’s 5-yard line. OSU redshirt junior quarterback Kenny Guiton entered the game for Miller, who twice fell to the turf with cramps, and handed the ball to Hyde who ran five yards for his second touchdown of the day. With 9:33 remaining in the game, the OSU points kept coming. Guiton drove the Buckeyes down and put the ball in senior fullback and captain Zach Boren’s hands. Boren ploughed into the end zone for the first rushing touchdown of his OSU career and extended his team’s stranglehold to 49-10. Lastly, freshman Bri’onte Dunn scored with 44 seconds to play in his OSU debut, and the Buckeyes led, 56-10. “Our offense is built to keep scoring,” Hyde said. “That’s Coach Meyer’s standard, and to have fun.” All the while, the Buckeyes’ defense stifled Miami’s rushing attack, allowing, if you can call it that, -1 yards in the game. And the Guiton-led offense did its job running out the clock, allowing OSU to finish the game with a comfortable distance between it and the RedHawks. OSU will host Central Florida next Saturday at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for noon. With Ohio State leading Miami (Ohio), 21-3, a mere three seconds before halftime, first-year coach Urban Meyer tried for a touchdown from the 1-yard line rather than take the easy field goal. “Ohio State should be able to knock it in from the 1-yard line,” Meyer said after the game. “I wanted to see how they would do.”  The attempt, a desperate lunge by junior running back Carlos Hyde, fell short and OSU came up empty handed at the stroke of half time. Nevertheless, an impression was made – Meyer and his aggressive play-calling style had officially arrived in Columbus. It was that same aggressive style that allowed Meyer’s No. 18 Buckeyes (1-0) to cruise to a 56-10 win against the unranked Miami RedHawks (0-1) Saturday at Ohio Stadium. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball sweeps Lipscomb in first round of NCAA tournament

Members of the OSU women’s volleyball team huddle during a game against Lipscomb on Dec. 5 in Lexington, Ky., during the 1st round of the NCAA Tournament. OSU won, 3-0.Credit: Chris Slack / Lantern photographerLEXINGTON, Ky. — Heading into a match against Lipscomb, Ohio State women’s volleyball coach Geoff Carlston had faced the Bisons once in his tenure at OSU, and won. Now he can say he’s 2-0.The Buckeyes (22-11) swept Lipscomb (25-20, 25-14, 25-18) in the first round of the NCAA tournament Friday night, and now have less than a day to prepare for their next opponent.“I thought we played great defense, which we knew we needed to do because they’re such a great defensive team,” Carlston said. “So it was a really good match. Obviously I’m really happy and excited we’re moving on.”In the first two sets alone, the Buckeyes had 16 blocks total, while the Bisons (21-9) had zero.  Sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe totaled for six in those two sets before finishing the night with 10, which is a career-high. Senior setter Taylor Sherwin tallied six total blocks, which was the second highest between the two teams.Freshman outside hitter Luisa Schirmer led all players in kills with 12 and added eight digs.  With this being her first NCAA tournament action, she said she was glad her teammates were behind her all the way.“I (felt) full confidence with my team behind me,” Schirmer said. “And I think that’s a great attitude going into our next match.”Senior outside hitter Erin Sekinger tallied 10 kills, which was tied for the second-most kills in the match.Since the Buckeyes played at 5 p.m. on Friday in Lexington, Ky., they have a chance to scout their next potential opponent live.“As a team we’re going to go and watch both teams, see what they do and how they play,” Sekinger said.In addition to her six blocks, Sherwin had a game-high 32 assists on the night and added nine digs, while sophomore libero Valeria León had a game-high 17 digs and had the Buckeyes two lone service aces.With a game-high 25 blocks, the Buckeyes are looking to carry over their defense into Saturday’s game.“I think if we take our style of play that we played tonight into our next match, tomorrow night, I think that will help us and we can build from that,” Sekinger said.Bison senior outside hitter Lauren Ford was the lone Bison to score double-digit kills with 10.  Freshman setter Kayla Ostrom assisted on 28 of her teams 31 kills.The Buckeyes are scheduled to play the winner of No. 13 Kentucky and the Horizon League champions Oakland. The match is scheduled to start at 7 p.m. at Memorial Coliseum. read more