Top 10 pass masters of the 2015/16 Premier League season revealed

first_img 8. John Obi Mikel – 89.54 per cent of the Chelsea midfielder’s passes were accurate 10 10 9. Morgan Schneiderlin – 89.51 per cent of the Manchester United midfielder’s passes were accurate 6. Mousa Dembele – 89.99 per cent of the Tottenham Hotspur midfielder’s passes were accurate 5. Gabriel Paulista – 90.18 per cent of the Arsenal defender’s passes were accurate 10 7. John Terry – 89.83 per cent of the Chelsea captain’s passes were accurate 2. Ki Sung-yueng – 90.94 per cent of the Swansea City midfielder’s passes were accurate It is a passing game, after all.In the modern world of football, coaches have grown focused on possession, urging their players to keep the ball in all areas of the pitch – even encouraging toing and froing between the defence.But to achieve success at the passing game, players have to deliver.So talkSPORT has taken a look at who the most successful passers in the Premier League for the 2015/16 campaign have been.Check out the top 10 players with the best pass completion rate, who attempted a minimum of 500 passes throughout the season, by viewing the slideshow above. 10 10. Kevin Wimmer – 89.46 per cent of the Tottenham Hotspur defender’s passes were accurate. Click the arrow above, right, to see the top 10 players with the best pass completion rate (minimum of 500 attempted passes) 4. Ibrahim Affelay – 90.19 per cent of the Stoke City forward’s passes were accurate 10 10 10 10 10 10 3. Santi Cazorla – 90.31 per cent of the Arsenal midfielder’s passes were accurate 1. Mohamed Elneny – 92.82 per cent of the Arsenal midfielder’s passes were accuratelast_img read more

Chelsea Ladies sign another England star

first_imgChelsea Ladies have signed England defender Laura Bassett.The 30-year-old joins from Birmingham City and goes straight in to the squad which departs for the International Women’s Club Championship in Japan this Saturday.Bassett has enjoyed a successful career to date, representing her country on 33 occasions, including at the 2009 and 2013 European Championships as well as the 2011 Fifa Women’s World Cup.At club level, she has been a key member of every club she has represented, with her second stint at Birmingham seeing her lift the 2012 FA Women’s Cup as well as successive FA WSL and Continental Cup runners-up spots.And she sees no reason why her previous success can’t be emulated with her latest club.Rachel Williams was recently signed.“The move is absolutely brilliant and I can’t wait to get started,” said Bassett.“It’s great that we’ve got an opportunity like Japan to get straight in to the action rather than have to wait until pre-season.“Chelsea is a massive club with a big-club mentality so it is a new challenge for me, which is exciting.”Bassett becomes the latest new addition to Chelsea Ladies manager Emma Hayes’ squad, with fellow England international Rachel Williams also joining the club earlier this month.The England duo will join the rest of the Chelsea squad in Japan for the IWCC, and will meet either Australian League winners Sydney FC or Japanese League runner-up NTV Beleza in the last four, with Japanese Cup and League winners INAC Kobe Leonessa or South American side Colo Colo their potential final opponent.And while Bassett admits she doesn’t know too much about their opponents in Japan, she is excited to have the opportunity to lift some silverware so early in her Chelsea career.She said: “Japan is a fantastic opportunity. It is the time of the year where we tend to relax physically and mentally but when an opportunity like this comes along you have to take it to experience the culture, the travel and to play in a tournament like it.“It’s a great chance to settle in and meet the team both on and off the pitch so when January comes round it makes that transition much easier.“It will be a good test out there. I don’t know loads about the opposition but it will be a good test and great to get minutes in a Chelsea shirt.”See also:Chelsea Ladies sign Brazilian midfield starChelsea Ladies sign Japan World Cup starChelsea Ladies star sees bright future for women’s football in EnglandChelsea Ladies star shortlisted by Fifa’Excited’ Williams joins Chelsea LadiesChelsea Ladies to head to Japan for Women’s Club ChampionshipChelsea Ladies star relishing Japan tripChelsea Ladies sign duo from ArsenalChelsea Ladies snap up Dutch 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Half-time: Exeter 0 Brentford 0

first_imgA much-changed Brentford, featuring two debutants, were held at the break after a first half of few chances at St. James Park.Philipp Hofmann dragged a shot wide from just outside the box early on, while Exeter’s Ryan Harley and Robbie Simpson both fired way off target.There was an injury concern for Brentford early on when Alan McCormack limped off, to be replaced by Ryan Woods.The game was largely devoid of goalmouth action until the Bees won a corner eight minutes before half-time.Emmanuel Ledesma, making his competitive debut after signing on non-contract terms earlier in the day, delivered the ball in for Hofmann, who couldn’t connect properly with the header and sent it past the far post.Harlee Dean drilled just wide after Jan Holldack, on his first appearance for Brentford, had got in the way of Woods’ shot, while Josh Clarke drew a comfortable save from Exeter keeper Bobby Olejnik.The hosts named 15-year-old Ethan Ampadu, son of former Leyton Orient man Kwame, in their starting line-up, and the Grecians’ youngest-ever player made a composed start to his senior career.Exeter: Olejnik; McCready, Sweeney, Ampadu, Moore-Taylor; Taylor, James, Harley, Riley-Lowe; Watkins, Simpson Subs: Pym, Woodman, Tillson, Wheeler, Oakley, McAlinden, Jay.Brentford: Bonham; Holldack, Dean, Egan, Field; Yennaris, McCormack (Woods 12); Clarke, Saunders, Ledesma; Hofmann. Subs: Bentley, Elder, Cole, Woods, Kerschbaumer, Shaibu, Hogan.See also:Bees complete move for LedesmaFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Draymond Green to miss 3 more games with finger sprain

first_imgHOUSTON — Warriors forward Draymond Green will miss at least three more games with a left index finger sprain, coach Steve Kerr said Wednesday morning. Guard D’Angelo Russell, sidelined with a sprained ankle, is probable to return sooner.Green, who missed the previous two games after suffering the injury in last week’s loss to the San Antonio Spurs, will not join the team on its current three-game road trip in Houston, Minnesota and Oklahoma City.Russell is with the team in Houston but will …last_img

Underwater Forest Discovered: How Old?

first_imgSixty feet down in Gulf waters off the coast of Alabama, stumps of an old cypress forest have appeared.  How can they be 52,000 years old when the wood still smells like cypress?The discovery was reported by Live Science.  It includes a five-minute video tour of the area which the discoverers are keeping secret till it can be thoroughly documented.  Hundreds of Bald Cypress stumps as large as two meters in diameter are found over a half-square-mile area, several miles from the coast of Mobile, Alabama in the Gulf of Mexico.  Fish, anemones and other marine creatures have taken up residence in the forest, causing it to decay more rapidly.The video clip claims the stumps are 12,000 years old, but the text says they have been radiocarbon dated at 52,000 years old.  The article claims that they might have been uncovered by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.  Before that, they may have been covered in sand, preventing oxygen from accelerating decomposition.Yet it appears incredible the trees could be that old.  For one thing, “The forest contains trees so well-preserved that when they are cut, they still smell like fresh Cypress sap,” one of the divers said.  For another, are scientists ready to claim that no hurricane of Katrina’s proportions occurred in the alleged 12,000 years since the trees sank below the surface?  Now, the trees are decaying so rapidly, the discoverers fear scientists only have two years to examine the site and perform more radiocarbon or tree-ring date calculations.  Divers said they could break off chunks of the wood with their hands.Update 7/30/13: Live Science reported that the wood is so fresh, efforts are underway to protect the forest before developers start harvesting it!  “If salvage companies get their way, an underwater forest of 50,000-year-old trees only recently discovered could be destroyed to make high-end coffee tables.”  No one is questioning the credibility of the date.  “The trees were in such pristine condition that fresh sap oozed from the stumps when they were cut,” the article said.Learn to ask the questions the reporters don’t ask.  None of them ever questions the evolutionary dates, even when they lead to absurdities, like expecting fresh-smelling wood to be 52,000 years old, or asking people to believe thousands of years went by with no hurricanes strong enough to expose the forest.  And how did the forest last as it gradually sank, unless a catastrophe buried it rapidly?  The presence of this preserved forest silently cries for a recent catastrophe.Creationists argue that radiocarbon dates are unreliable before the Flood, because the atmosphere changed drastically.  Putting that together with the evolutionary absurdities, we can reason that the forest was probably buried around the time of the Flood or after.  It’s a stretch, though, to think five thousand years went by without a disturbance, so it may be younger than that.  The old date for such fresh wood, though, is clearly incredible. (Visited 40 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Gecko Gripper Picks Up Anything

first_imgThe gecko gripper is just one of many exciting developments in the field of biomimetics: the imitation of nature’s designs.Watch this video clip at PhysOrg: a new gripping device can pick up anything from a basketball to a water bottle without squeezing it. It relies on Van der Waals atomic forces, just like the spatulae on gecko toes. Think of the applications for this surprising substance. “Using a glove with this material, a child could palm a basketball, but could still toss an air-filled balloon without having it stick. It’s super-grippy, but not sticky at all.”Living cells have molecular pumps that are inspiring work at Northwestern University. PhysOrg reports on the first artificial molecular pump inspired by nature.Is hemp good for anything beyond altering people’s consciousness? It could join wheat straw as an ingredient in the rapidly expanding field of “bio-based materials,” the “construction industry’s best-kept secret,” PhysOrg reports.“Auxetic materials” is a new term for new lifelike materials that get fatter when stretched and thinner when compressed—opposite most artificial materials. Inspired by seashells, these materials “are inspiring a new wave of safety gear in sport” (PhysOrg).Got teeth? If you’d like to keep them, be glad that researchers are on the verge of creating “Revolutionary therapeutic dental adhesives with the aptitude to remineralize the resin-dentine bonding interface through biomimetic processes,” Science Daily reports happily.  This won’t just fill teeth; it will rebuild them. Medical Xpress adds that the “natural reparative capacity of teeth” is being elucidated at a Paris university.Spider silk has long been a biomimetic favorite. How about the web structure itself? Nature reports that MIT’s wizards have 3-D printed a web out of resin that “could be used in applications such as reinforcing industrial materials.” Lab tests showed that “they could strengthen the web by adjusting the diameter of the threads radiating out from the middle, and that of the threads that spiral around the web.” How did spiders figure that out?As for spider silk itself, despair not: Science Daily brings good news from MIT: “After years of research decoding the complex structure and production of spider silk, researchers have now succeeded in producing samples of this exceptionally strong and resilient material in the laboratory. The new development could lead to a variety of biomedical materials — from sutures to scaffolding for organ replacements — made from synthesized silk with properties specifically tuned for their intended uses.” No spiders were needed for the simulation.Robotics is a major field that relies on biomimetics. Some recent examples:Nature writes about Europeans building “Robots that can adapt like animals” including responding to injuries. “Experiments reveal successful adaptations for a legged robot injured in five different ways, including damaged, broken, and missing legs, and for a robotic arm with joints broken in 14 different ways. This new algorithm will enable more robust, effective, autonomous robots, and may shed light on the principles that animals use to adapt to injury.“Science Daily writes about robots that master skills by trial and error, “using a process that more closely approximates the way humans learn, marking a major milestone in the field of artificial intelligence.”Humans are at the frontier of cyber-physical systems, PhysOrg says. Researchers got a $8.75 million grant, part of which is for developing “microrobots with synthetic cells to perform functions that may one day lead to tissue and organ re-generation.”Nature published a Review article about the status of “probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence.”Christoph Adami, one of the promoters of computer evolution models, is working on robots, too. Nature reports that he is using “evolutionary algorithms” to create robots with instincts. Like the ID community keeps pointing out, though, the researcher is sneaking information into the algorithm. Dembski has proved that no evolutionary algorithm is superior to blind chance unless extra information is intelligently supplied (Law of Conservation of Information; see latest explanation in his new book Being as Communion).Evolution is to biomimetics as fly is to ointment. Keep out, Darwin; your age has passed. It’s the information age now.Young people need inspiration to get into science. Biomimetics is a golden pathway into a new scientific age of inspiration, understanding, and wealth, yielding practical applications that can help the whole world. (Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Turning up the media volume

first_imgThis article originally appeared on pagefour of South Africa Now, a six-pagesupplement to the Washington Postproduced on behalf of Brand South Africa.(Click to enlarge.)RELATED ARTICLES• New journalism centre for SU• Keeping the story of HIV alive in SA• Myths, reality and the World Cup• Tutu speaks out for press freedom• Rhodes hosts world journalism meetAnton HarberSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place.After decades of censorship – imposed silence over crucial areas of apartheid– the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening.First there were effectively no media laws at all, then the new Constitution, adopted in 1996, explicitly protected freedom of speech and media, excluding only propaganda for war, incitement to violence and hate speech.The new African National Congress (ANC) government had a positive policy to transform the media and rid it of its apartheid inheritance, encourage diversity and give a media voice to previously excluded communities.Newspapers went through a difficult time of consolidation, with some going out of business, but then there was a boom in tabloids, making this one of the few countries where newspaper sales went up in the early 21st century. Papers like the Daily Sun created a huge new set of newspaper readers, and gave voice to the working class, a voice which had been absent from mainstream media.Investigative journalism flourished, with exposés of every controversial aspect of South African life: bad governance, wasteful spending, white collar crime and social conditions. If the test of an effective watchdog media is that crooks and scoundrels sleep restlessly, then the South African newspapers passed with flying colours. No-one was spared: not even the national chief of police and the president’s personal financial adviser, both of whom were sentenced to prison after being exposed in the media.But media is a contested political area. Democracy not only means freedom of the media, but freedom to criticise, denounce and take issue with the media.Tough news coverage has brought accusations of unfairness, lack of balance and ethics and invasions of personal dignity and privacy. In a society with a long history of racial inequality, issues of dignity are particularly sensitive. These are not unique to South Africa, but they come against the background of a tense transition to democracy, a media often tainted by apartheid history, the fragility of a new social compact and a young government operating under difficult circumstances.This has led to intense debate about whether the media exercises enough responsibility along with its rights: in particular, how to balance freedom of speech against the right to dignity. A new secrecy Bill – intended to bring old apartheid law in line with the new constitution – is hotly contested amid accusations that it seeks to cast the net of secrecy too widely. The Bill is currently being debated in parliament.The ruling ANC has expressed its unhappiness with the newspapers’ system of self-regulation – an ombudsman and a press council – and proposes a statutory appeals tribunal, as recourse for those aggrieved by their treatment at the hands of journalists. They argue that editors have been too reluctant to apologise and correct when they get things wrong.The tribunal suggestion has increased the volume more than ever, with a host of civil society organisations, legal bodies, political parties, academics and institutions speaking out against it.That this proposal can be so hotly debated is itself a sign of a vigorous, open and healthily contested democracy. Clearly, South Africans are not going to give up any freedoms lightly. There is going to be a lot of noise around the right to make noise.Professor Anton Harber is the director of the journalism programme at the University of the Wiwatersrand. He is a former joint founder and editor of the Mail & Guardian newspaper.Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB), or read selected articles online:Powering towards a green economySouth Africa plans to build a massive $21.8-billion, 5 000 MW solar park in its semi-desert Northern Cape province as part of an aggressive push to grow its highly industrialised economy without increasing its carbon footprint.The everyday beauty of SowetoSouth African photographer Jodi Bieber has a special ability to bring out the beauty in the ordinary, even the disfigured. On the cover of Time magazine she made a mutilated Afghani girl look beautiful, and in her latest book Soweto she makes everyday township life shine.Launchpad to a billion consumersBy offering to acquire Massmart for some $4.2-billion, Wal-Mart has joined the parade of global companies looking to South Africa as a springboard into what is increasingly seen as the world’s last great investment frontier.A trek to the start of timeIt will probe the edges of our universe. It will be a virtual time machine, helping scientists explore the origins of galaxies. It’s the Square Kilometre Array, and South Africans are at the heart of its development.Brewing up a global brandMiller Lite. Tastes great. Less filling. And brought to you by world-beating South African company SABMiller.Looking south and east for growthAs the shift in global economic power gains momentum, South Africa’s trade is moving eastwards and southwards in a pattern that both reflects the worldwide trend and helps drive it, writes John Battersby.More than just a celluloid MandelaThere is a special bond between Hollywood actor Morgan Freeman and the man he played in the Clint Eastwood movie Invictus, South African statesman Nelson Mandela.Africa in the new world orderKgalema Motlanthe, South Africa’s deputy president, looks at how African economies’ resilient performance during the global financial crisis points to the continent’s new place in a changing world.Mining history for new solutionsMark Cutifani, CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company, examines why South Africa’s past is key to successfully doing business here in the future.Turning up the media volumeSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place. After decades of apartheid censorship, the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening, writes Anton Harber.A joule of an energy-efficient carSouth Africa, which builds BMWs and Mercedes Benzes for the US market, is in the thick of the race to deliver a truly practical – and stylish – electric car. Meet the Joule.South Africa: Time to believeThe forgiving philosophy of “ubuntu” helps explain how South Africa managed to transcend its turbulent apartheid past and create a unified democracy, writes Simon Barber.Finding sound real estate investmentSouth Africa’s post-apartheid transformation and new middle class are fuelling demand for affordable homes. For private equity fund International Housing Solutions, that means opportunity.My normal, crazy, mixed-up countrySouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Bring on the braaiAll South Africans love it – including Nobel peace prize-winning Desmond Tutu – and its rich, smoky smell floats over the country every Sunday. Celebrate the braai with our great recipe for making boerewors, traditional South African farmer’s sausage.last_img read more

Cote d’Ivoire crisis: Zuma looks to AU

first_img24 January 2011South African President Jacob Zuma has pinned his hopes on this week’s African Union meeting in Ethiopia to defuse the unfolding political crisis in Cote d’Ivoire.Political rivals Laurent Gbagbo and Alassane Ouattara have been at loggerheads since a disputed second-round presidential election in Cote d’Ivoire in November last year, bringing that country to a political standstill.Both the United Nations (UN) and the African Union (AU) have since come out in support of Outtara, who is widely believed to have won the poll. Gbagbo is still clinging to power, however, and maintains control of the country’s army, a number of its state bodies and much of its cocoa sector.According to the UN, the post-election stalemate has so far left around 247 people dead and forced thousands to flee their homes.‘Political solution similar to Sudan’s’Speaking to journalists in Pretoria on Friday, Zuma said he was hoping a solution would be found soon, and called on the AU to discuss the matter with both leaders.“We are hoping that the AU will be able to resolve the matter and convince the parties … Our view is that we need to do something to help the situation, and don’t demand that one leader should go,” Zuma said.He was speaking following a meeting with Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, who was on a two-day state visit to South Africa.Both Zuma and Museveni agreed that a political solution similar to that of South Sudan was needed to bring about political stability in Cote d’Ivoire.Pretoria would further support any recommendation of the AU to prevent any outbreak of violence in resolving the standoff between Gbagbo and Ouattara, Zuma said.Pressure on Gbagbo mountsThe United States, meanwhile, says is working with its African partners to impose sanctions against Gbagbo and his supporters, along with a broadened a travel ban, in the latest bid to pressure him to step down.“At this point, there are travel restrictions and financial restrictions on Gbagbo and his immediate circle of friends and family and those people who allow him to remain in power,” US Assistant Secretary for Africa Bruce Wharton said in Pretoria on Thursday.He was addressing the media on US government policy in Africa and the year ahead.The US has joined other countries and blocs, such as the European Union, which have frozen Gbagbo’s assets.Wharton said the US would continue to increase these pressures, making it more difficult for Gbagbo to remain where he was.“It’s my hope that eventually he will see that the future of Cote d’Ivoire and the people that he claims to serve is best served by his departure,” Wharton said. “And if that can be done peacefully, then Cote d’Ivoire can move on.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Khar cops surprise senior citizen with a birthday cake

first_imgIn a heart-warming gesture, cops from the Khar police station ensured that a senior citizen in their area was not alone on her birthday. On Saturday, four constables surprised Kumud Joshi, a retired professor, with a cake to ring in her 77th birthday.“I was pleasantly surprised to find the police officials with a birthday cake at my doorstep,” Ms. Joshi told The Hindu. “At this age, we don’t really get many visitors or people to talk to. People like us require a support system as it increases the confidence in living,” she said.The Mumbai Police’s official Twitter handle tweeted about the surprise to Ms. Joshi which led to a flood of birthday wishes for her on the social media, with many people praising the cops for their thoughtfulness. On Sunday, Ms. Joshi was presented with a collage of birthday wishes that came for her on Twitter.The surprise was planned by SI Khalil Shaikh who often visits Ms. Joshi and is constantly in touch with her. “We exchange greetings every morning on the phone. When I realised that it was her birthday, I decided to plan a surprise for her,” said Mr. Shaikh adding that the Khar police had been lending an ear to lonely seniors citizens for a long time. “At times, they want someone to have a conversation with them, so we do share our personal numbers. When we visit them, they feel really ecstatic as if a family member has come to visit them,” he said.When it comes to crime, senior citizens have always been vulnerable targets. Thus, being in touch with the local police is often helpful for them. “The cops have even gone to the extent of fetching medicines for me. During elections, they helped me get to the polling station and even dropped me back home after I cast my vote,” said Ms. Joshi.With increasing number of senior citizens living alone, many of them treat the policemen as their family members. “We always have varied experiences with the citizens. While some feel guarded and secured, many are apprehensive to our visits as they do not like their neighbours wondering why the police are paying a visit. We need to make these visits to ensure that the people living around them or working in their houses are aware that we are in constant contact with them. It helps us in preventing crimes,” Mr. Shaikh said.last_img read more