Rafa thought of ending season after Indian Wells injury

first_imgParis: French Open champion Rafa Nadal has said he nearly ended his season after being forced to withdraw from the Indian Wells semi-finals with a knee injury in March but played through the pain at Roland Garros to clinch a record-extending 12th title. Nadal conceded a walkover to Roger Federer at Indian Wells and skipped the Miami Open before returning to the tour for the clay season, where he lost three semi-finals in a row before winning titles in Rome and Paris. Also Read – Andy Murray to make Grand Slam return at Australian Open”Mentally, after Indian Wells, I suffered a major downturn,” the Spaniard told the ATP’s website. “I considered shutting down my season to see if my body would recuperate instead of playing through injury after injury. “Another option was to press on and play through the pain. Either way, the outlook was bleak. It required a change of mindset… and that doesn’t happen overnight. I was reluctant and hesitant to return. Physically, because of another tendon tear in my knee, and on top of going through all the treatment required in the recovery process, there was dealing with the pain.” Also Read – Mandhana ruled out of South Africa ODI seriesThe 33-year-old said he had struggled to stay motivated because of the constant pain but had been determined to acquit himself well at Roland Garros. “Between the level of pain and just being sidelined, there came a time when I just felt tired of all of this,” he added. “I was sick of always being in pain. After Indian Wells, I took a moment to make sense of all of it… I promised myself that I would play through Roland Garros with the attitude and energy necessary to confront all obstacles in my way.” Nadal’s French Open victory put him two Grand Slam titles behind Federer’s all-time record of 20 and the Spaniard has announced his intention not to play again until Wimbledon, which begins on July 1.last_img read more

UN anticrime agency pledges continued support to Indonesia to combat corruption

“We will continue to support the national efforts in corruption prevention and eradication,” the Executive Director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Yury Fedotov, told reporters at an event organized by Indonesia’s Corruption Eradication Commission (known by the acronym KPK) in the capital, Jakarta.Indonesia is home to the largest single UNODC country programme in the region, which provides support to anti-corruption efforts by the Supreme Court, the KPK, the criminal justice system and general law enforcement. It also involves civil society mobilization to better combat emerging threats such as corruption and its links to deforestation. In his remarks, Mr. Fedotov praised President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s commitment to independent anti-corruption agencies and highlighted UNODC’s work supporting Government initiatives to combat corruption, illicit drugs, and wildlife, forest and environmental crimes. “Transnational organized criminal syndicates operating in Indonesia and the region play a role in illicit resource extraction – like protected natural resources, timber, fish and other wildlife – and crimes which harm the environment. They are a threat to public health and society’s well-being,” said Mr. Fedotov. “Let’s put them out of business.” While in Jakarta, Mr. Fedotov met with senior Government officials to whom he reiterated the importance of the strong partnership between UNODC and national authorities to strengthen the rule of law and improve the capacity of anti-corruption institutions, implement prison reform, and combat environmental crime, as well as the use of illicit drugs.The UNODC chief’s four-day visit to Indonesia concludes his five-country trip to Southeast Asia to engage both with government counterparts and civil society partners. Prior to Indonesia, Mr. Fedotov visited Thailand, Myanmar, Viet Nam and Laos, where he exchanged views with regional leaders on the human security challenges facing the region and how the world body could respond better. read more