Correction Female Game Artists story

Correction: Female Game Artists story by The Associated Press Posted May 30, 2016 8:33 am MDT Last Updated Jun 1, 2016 at 10:00 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email PHILADELPHIA – In a story May 30 about female video game developers, The Associated Press reported erroneously when Gamergate, a controversy over video game criticism and ensuing online harassment of women in the industry, began. It began in 2014, not 2013.A corrected version of the story is below:After Gamergate, female video game developers on the riseThe male-dominated video game industry is changing as more women get involved in designing, playing and reviewing themBy NATALIE POMPILIOAssociated PressStudents from an all-female arts college in Philadelphia attended a conference for video game developers last year and, without even trying, they stood out.“We were basically the only girls in the room,” recalled Lindsey O’Brien, 21, a rising senior at Philadelphia’s Moore College of Art & Design.The male-dominated video game industry is changing as more women develop games, play games and take jobs reviewing games. While the ongoing cyber harassment of female gamers known as “Gamergate” indicates a reluctance by some to accept the growing number of women in the industry, mainstream institutions are welcoming all to the console.Moore’s animation and gaming arts program will see its first class of game developers graduate next year. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology created its Game Lab in 2012. New York University’s Tisch School began offering a video game design degree last year.“There’s going to be a huge boom of women entering the industry in the next 10 years,” said Stephen Wood, Moore’s gaming arts professor, who took over the fledging program when he joined the faculty in 2014. “In the ’80s and ’90s, video games were seen as things boys do. But in the ’90s and early 2000s, girls said, ‘We’re going to play, too.’ Now those girls are going to college and studying video games. We’re helping close that gender gap and being part of the solution.”According to a 2015 survey by the International Game Developers Association, the number of female video game developers has doubled in the past seven years, from 11 per cent in 2009 to about 21 per cent now. About 79 per cent of the survey’s 2,000 respondents agreed diversity in the industry is “very” or “somewhat” important.“Much dialogue has occurred in the past couple of years around the topic, (with) a strong majority recognizing that greater diversity on development teams creates a stronger foundation for the team to create games that may maximize their global appeal,” said Kate Edwards, executive director of the association.Since joining Moore, Wood has seen the gaming arts program grow from eight students to about 40. He acknowledges he had some bias against female game creators until he saw his students’ work.“They create these awesome games that are no different than what you’d see in the industry today,” he said. “It’s a misperception that girls are making games with rainbows and unicorns. They’re really not. I don’t play a new game and say, ‘Oh, this was designed by a woman, this was designed by a guy.’”O’Brien learned the ins and outs of gaming from her mother, who could tear up the Atari. O’Brien started out on Sega Genesis and PlayStation systems, bonding with her older brother as they played games like “Mortal Kombat.”“I have tons of female friends who like shooter games, like ‘Call of Duty,’” she said. “A lot of people who aren’t part of the community are shocked when they hear that.”“Gamergate” began in 2014 after anonymous online commenters claimed a female video game developer was getting an unjust amount of attention for a new product. She was the victim of cyber harassment that then spread to other women in the industry, including Edwards, the executive director of the Game Developers Association.Edwards said the incidents have raised important industry issues. Intel, for example, pledged $300 million in 2015 to fund a three-year effort to increase the number of under-represented groups — including women, Hispanics and African-Americans — by 14 per cent.Wood said he talks to his students about the potential for abuse. The good thing, he said, is Moore students have a tight bond and can stand together against such threats. O’Brien, too, said she expects some negative responses, but she’s ready for them.“There are some people who say girls don’t know about games, that girls can’t make games,” O’Brien said. “I think if somebody has the skills to do the job, they should do the job.” In this Friday, May 13, 2016, photo, animation and gaming arts student Lindsey O’Brien works on her project at Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia. The male-dominated video game industry is changing as more women develop games, play games and take jobs reviewing games. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) read more

Live at the Apollo UN chief urges Democracy Prep grads to help

‹ › “We provide shelter to refugees – and schools for refugee children who have been forced to flee fighting in Syria and other troubled parts of the world,” he continued, adding that: “Our peacekeepers destroy weapons and train ex-soldiers for new jobs that contribute to society.” When there is an earthquake, a tsunami or a flood, the United Nations rushes in with food, medicine and hope. The Secretary-General said that the world body also negotiates and mediates to prevent wars and establish peace.The United Nations needs all kinds of people: politicians, diplomats, lawyers, doctors, teachers, engineers, police and more, he said, declaring: “I am here to say: we need you!”“We need you to think beyond the borders of the United States. We need you be global citizens. Climate change, poverty and violence affect all countries. We have to respond as one human family,” he said.The Secretary-General noted that every single one of the graduates was going to college. That is why he referred to them as the “class of twenty-seventeen.” He urged them to take the strength inside them and challenge every problem. “Then look for a harder problem – one that affects more people. Reach inside yourself and fulfil the promise of your school to change the world,” he said.The UN chief said that Democracy Prep “is very close to my heart” because it proved his belief that education transforms the world. In that spirit, he had launched the Global Education First initiative, with the aim of getting some 57 million out-of-school children back in school by the year 2015.“We want to raise more leaders like you – people who will shape a new future. You are my inspiration. Keep changing our world,” the Secretary-General said in closing. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Congressman Charles Rangel at the Apollo Theater in Harlem for the first graduation ceremony of Democracy Prep Public School. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe “This is your moment,” the Secretary-General said in a rousing commencement address as the first graduating class of Democracy Prep High walked across the stage at the legendary Apollo Theater in historic Harlem, New York City, to receive their diplomas.Democracy Prep Public Schools are a network of six open-enrolment, high performing, public charter schools, serving some 1,600 students in Harlem. The School’s stated mission is to educate “responsible citizen-scholars for success in the college of their choice and a life of active citizenship.”“Congratulations on the first graduation of this remarkable school!” said Mr. Ban, adding:“You rose to every challenge. You showed that you appreciate tough demands. And you are ready to reach for the stars.”Telling the graduates that he had always dreamed of appearing live at the Apollo but the problem was that he could not sing, Mr. Ban still managed to kick off his commencement speech with a song – showing a music video by Beyoncé, entitled I was Here. He said that when the video was taped, the pop superstar asked him about the work of the United Nations and he had explained that the Organization feeds about a hundred million hungry people around the world each day; it works to save the lives of millions of children with vaccines and basic health care. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and his wife, Yoo Soon-taek, take a group photo with the graduating class of the Democracy Prep Public School at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, applauds graduating students during the first graduation ceremony of Democracy Prep Public School. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, delivers the keynote address at the first graduation ceremony of Democracy Prep Public School. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, delivers the keynote address at the first graduation ceremony of Democracy Prep Public School. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, delivers the keynote address at the first graduation ceremony of Democracy Prep Public School. UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe read more